Roman Law And The Legal World Of The Romans

Author: Andrew M. Riggsby
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 052168711X
File Size: 35,16 MB
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In this book, Andrew Riggsby surveys the main areas of Roman law, and their place in Roman life.

Obligations In Roman Law

Author: Thomas A. J. McGinn
Editor: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472118439
File Size: 11,76 MB
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Explores a fundamental building block of Roman life

Roman Law Comparative Law

Author: Alan Watson
Editor: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820312613
File Size: 53,41 MB
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Provides a comprehensive description of the system of Roman law, discussing slavery, property, contracts, delicts and succession. Also examines the ways in which Roman law influenced later legal systems such as the structure of European legal systems, tort law in the French civil code, differences between contract law in France and Germany, parameters of judicial reasoning, feudal law, and the interests of governments in making and communicating law.

The Oxford Handbook Of Roman Law And Society

Author: Paul J. du Plessis
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198728689
File Size: 19,46 MB
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Sumario: Front Matter - Part I Introduction - Part II Reading Roman Law - Part III The Constitutional Structure of the Roman State- Part IV Legal Professionals and Legal Culture - Part V Settling Disputes - Part VI Persons before the Law - Part VII Legal Relations - End Matter.

The Spirit Of Roman Law

Author: Alan Watson
Editor: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 0820330612
File Size: 70,83 MB
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This book is not about the rules or concepts of Roman law, says Alan Watson, but about the values and approaches, explicit and implicit, of those who made the law. The scope of Watson's concerns encompasses the period from the Twelve Tables, around 451 B.C., to the end of the so-called classical period, around A.D. 235. As he discusses the issues and problems that faced the Roman legal intelligentsia, Watson also holds up Roman law as a clear, although admittedly extreme, example of law's enormous impact on society in light of society's limited input into law. Roman private law has been the most admired and imitated system of private law in the world, but it evolved, Watson argues, as a hobby of gentlemen, albeit a hobby that carried social status. The jurists, the private individuals most responsible for legal development, were first and foremost politicians and (in the Empire) bureaucrats; their engagement with the law was primarily to win the esteem of their peers. The exclusively patrician College of Pontiffs was given a monopoly on interpretation of private law in the mid fifth century B.C. Though the College would lose its exclusivity and monopoly, interpretation of law remained one mark of a Roman gentleman. But only interpretation of the law, not conceptualization or systematization or reform, gave prestige, says Watson. Further, the jurists limited themselves to particular modes of reasoning: no arguments to a ruling could be based on morality, justice, economic welfare, or what was approved elsewhere. No praetor (one of the elected officials who controlled the courts) is famous for introducing reforms, Watson points out, and, in contrast with a nonjurist like Cicero, no jurist theorized about the nature of law. A strong characteristic of Roman law is its relative autonomy, and isolation from the rest of life. Paradoxically, this very autonomy was a key factor in the Reception of Roman Law--the assimilation of the learned Roman law as taught at the universities into the law of the individual territories of Western Europe.

The Roman Law Tradition

Author: A. D. E. Lewis
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521441995
File Size: 73,46 MB
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The law developed by the ancient Romans remains a powerful legal and political instrument today. In The Roman Law Tradition a general editorial introduction complements a series of more detailed essays by an international team of distinguished legal scholars exploring the various ways in which Roman law has affected and continues to affect patterns of legal decision-making throughout the world.

The Historical And Institutional Context Of Roman Law

Author: George Mousourakis
Editor: Gower Publishing, Ltd.
ISBN: 9780754621089
File Size: 67,76 MB
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Roman law forms an important part of the intellectual background of many legal systems currently in force in continental Europe, Latin America and other parts of the world. This book traces the historical development of Roman law from the earliest period of Roman history up to and including Justinian's codification in the sixth century AD. It examines the nature of the sources of law, forms of legal procedure, the mechanisms by which legal judgments were put into effect, the development of legal science and the role of the jurists in shaping the law. The final chapter of the book outlines the history of Roman law during the Middle Ages and discusses the way in which Roman law furnished the basis of the civil law systems of continental Europe. The book combines the perspectives of legal history with those of social, political and economic history. Special attention is given to the political development of the Roman society and to the historical events and socio-economic factors that influenced the growth and progress of the law. Designed to provide a general introduction to the history of Roman law, this book will appeal to law students whose course of studies includes Roman law, legal history and comparative law. It will also prove of value to students and scholars interested in ancient history and classics.

Roman Law And European Legal History

Author: Ditlev Tamm
Editor: Djoef Pub
ISBN:
File Size: 38,88 MB
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What does Roman law offer today? This text gives an introduction to basic institutions of Roman law and a survey of European legal history from the fall of the Roman Empire up to the present day.

Encyclopedic Dictionary Of Roman Law

Author:
Editor: American Philosophical Society
ISBN: 9780871694324
File Size: 17,47 MB
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Roman Law And Economics Volume I

Author: Giuseppe Dari-Mattiacci
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198787200
File Size: 40,59 MB
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Ancient Rome is the only society in the history of the western world whose legal profession evolved autonomously, distinct and separate from institutions of political and religious power. Roman legal thought has left behind an enduring legacy and exerted enormous influence on the shaping of modern legal frameworks and systems, but its own genesis and context pose their own explanatory problems. The economic analysis of Roman law has enormous untapped potential in this regard: by exploring the intersecting perspectives of legal history, economic history, and the economic analysis of law, the two volumes of Roman Law and Economics are able to offer a uniquely interdisciplinary examination of the origins of Roman legal institutions, their functions, and their evolution over a period of more than 1000 years, in response to changes in the underlying economic activities that those institutions regulated. Volume I explores these legal institutions and organizations in detail, from the constitution of the Roman Republic to the management of business in the Empire, while Volume II covers the concepts of exchange, ownership, and disputes, analysing the detailed workings of credit, property, and slavery, among others. Throughout each volume, contributions from specialists in legal and economic history, law, and legal theory are underpinned by rigorous analysis drawing on modern empirical and theoretical techniques and methodologies borrowed from economics. In demonstrating how these can be fruitfully applied to the study of ancient societies, with due deference to the historical context, Roman Law and Economics opens up a host of new avenues of research for scholars and students in each of these fields and in the social sciences more broadly, offering new ways in which different modes of enquiry can connect with and inform each other.

The State Law And Religion

Author: Alan Watson
Editor: University of Georgia Press
ISBN: 9780820313870
File Size: 73,44 MB
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Written by one of our most respected legal historians, this book analyzes the interaction of law and religion in ancient Rome. As such, it offers a major new perspective on the nature and development of Roman law in the early republic and empire before Christianity was recognized and encouraged by Constantine. At the heart of the book is the apparent paradox that Roman private law is remarkably secular even though, until the late second century B.C., the Romans were regarded (and regarded themselves) as the most religious people in the world. Adding to the paradox was the fact that the interpretation of private law, which dealt with relations between private citizens, lay in the hands of the College of Pontiffs, an advisory body of priests. Alan Watson traces the roots of the paradox--and the way in which Roman law ultimately developed--to the conflict between patricians and plebeians that occurred in the mid-fifth century B.C. When the plebeians demanded equality of all citizens before the law, the patricians prepared in response the Twelve Tables, a law code that included only matters considered appropriate for plebeians. Public law, which dealt with public officials and the governance of the state, was totally excluded form the code, thus preserving gross inequalities between the classes of Roman citizens. Religious law, deemed to be the preserve of patrician priests, was also excluded. As Watson notes, giving a monopoly of legal interpretation to the College of Pontiffs was a shrewd move to maintain patrician advantages; however, a fundamental consequence was that modes of legal reasoning appropriate for judgments in sacred law were carried over to private law, where they were often less appropriate. Such reasoning, Watson contends, persists even in modern legal systems. After sketching the tenets of Roman religion and the content of the Twelve Tables, Watson proceeds to such matters as formalism in religion and law, religion and property, and state religion versus alien religion. In his concluding chapter, he compares the law that emerged after the adoption of the Twelve Tables with the law that reportedly existed under the early Roman kings.

New Frontiers

Author: Paul J du Plessis
Editor: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748668195
File Size: 48,14 MB
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An interdisciplinary, edited collection on social science methodologies for approaching Roman legal sources. Roman law as a field of study is rapidly evolving to reflect new perspectives and approaches in research. Scholars who work on the subject are i

Roman Law In European History

Author: Peter Stein
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521643724
File Size: 32,65 MB
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This is a short and succinct summary of the unique position of Roman law in European culture by one of the world's leading legal historians. Peter Stein's masterly study assesses the impact of Roman law in the ancient world, and its continued unifying influence throughout medieval and modern Europe. Roman Law in European History is unparalleled in lucidity and authority, and should prove of enormous utility for teachers and students (at all levels) of legal history, comparative law and European Studies. Award-winning on its appearance in German translation, this English rendition of a magisterial work of interpretive synthesis is an invaluable contribution to the understanding of perhaps the most important European legal tradition of all.

Textbook On Roman Law

Author: J. Andrew Borkowski
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN:
File Size: 57,20 MB
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Within the space of a thousand years, Roman society transformed itself from an insignificant tribe on the Italian mainland struggling for territorial supremacy, to one of the most accomplished civilisations of the ancient world, whose Empire extended over the greater part of Western Europe,the Mediterranean and northern Africa. This transformation was not a chance event. It was a direct result of the Roman genius for government and the law. Through a relentless campaign of "empire building", Roman armies conquered and subjugated vast territories. Unlike other conquerors of the ancientworld, however, the Romans were keenly aware that their dominance of these regions could only be maintained through a process of "Romanization" that included the installation of an effective bureaucracy utilising a flexible system of law. Although the Roman Empire was destined to disintegrate overtime, its legal system left an indelible imprint on Western Europe. Roman law, as rediscovered by the Italian Glossators in the eleventh century, provided the conceptual foundation of many modern legal systems, and continues to provide an invaluable introduction to paradigms of legal thought and thestudy of legal concepts. Above all, Roman law is richly rewarding to study for its own sake, as a remarkable feat of organized good sense and structured orderliness.The book provides students with a lucid and readable exposition of Roman civil law and procedure. To make the subject more accessible, the author sets the law in the context of the history of Rome and keeps the use of Latin phrases to a minimum. A major feature of the book is the use of texts (intranslation) from the most important sources of Roman law. The texts serve to illustrate the law and to make it more vivid for the reader.This third edition has been fully updated to reflect recent developments in Romanist scholarship. References to key articles and books have been incorporated into the text and further reading sections included at the end of each chapter. The final chapter on Roman law and the European ius communehas been substantially expanded.Online Resource CentreDT Glossary of Latin terms appearing in the text.DT Annotated web links to search engines and websites devoted to Roman law.DT Comprehensive time line incorporating Roman legal and social history.DT Short biographies of key figures in Roman legal history.DT Original Latin versions of citations reproduced in the bookDT Multiple choice questions covering each chapter.

The Sources Of Roman Law

Author: O. F. Robinson
Editor: Psychology Press
ISBN: 9780415089944
File Size: 58,30 MB
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The notion and understanding of law penetrated society in Ancient Rome to a degree unparalleled in modern times. The poet Juvenal, for instance, described the virtuous man as a good soldier, faithful guardian, incorruptible judge and honest witness. This book is concerned with four central questions: Who made the law? Where did a Roman go to discover what the law was? How has the law survived to be known to us today? And what procedures were there for putting the law into effect? In The Sources of Roman Law, the origins of law and their relative weight are described in the light of developing Roman history. This is a topic that appeals to a wide range of readers: the law student will find illumination for the study of the substantive law; the student of history will be guided into an appreciation of what Roman law means as well as its value for the understanding and interpretation of Roman history. Both will find invaluable the description of how the sources have survived to inform our legal system and pose their problems for us.

Borkowski S Textbook On Roman Law

Author: Paul J. du Plessis
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198848013
File Size: 15,69 MB
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Borkowski's Textbook on Roman Law is the leading contemporary textbook in the field of Roman law, and has been written with undergraduate students firmly in mind. The book provides a clear and highly engaging account of Roman private law and civil procedure, with coverage of all key topics, including the Roman legal system, and the law of persons, property, and obligations. The book gives a comprehensive overview of both the historical context and modern relevance of Roman law today. Included are references to a wide range of scholarly texts, to ground the judicious account of Roman law firmly in contemporary scholarship. There are also examples from legal practice, as well as truncated timelines at the start of each chapter to illustrate how the law developed over time. The book contains a wealth of learning features, including chapter summaries, diagrams and maps. A major feature of the book is the inclusion of translated extracts from the most important sources of Roman law: the Digest and the Institutes of Justinian. Annotated further reading sections at the end of each chapter act as a guide to further enquiry. Online resources The book is accompanied by extensive online resources, including: - Self-test questions on the key topics of Roman law give students the opportunity to test learning. These questions test factual knowledge to help consolidate understanding of key topics and they are interactive providing the correct answer to each question and a reference to the relevant part of the textbook. - Revision sheets and sample essay questions aid exam preparation. - An interactive timeline supplements the list of dates featured in the introduction to the textbook. It may also be used as a schematic guide to chapter 1 (Introduction: Rome-a historical sketch). The timeline provides a chronological overview of the development of Roman private law in its political and historical context. - Short biographies of key figures to be used in conjunction with the timeline to supplement the discussion of the jurists in chapter 2 (The sources of Roman law). - There is also a glossary of Latin terms; annotated web links; guidance on finding Roman law texts and associated literature; and tips regarding textual analysis to guide the reader in interpreting the texts.

The Cambridge Companion To Roman Law

Author: David Johnston
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521895642
File Size: 16,33 MB
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This book reflects the wide range of current scholarship on Roman law, covering private, criminal and public law.

Law And Crime In The Roman World

Author: Jill Harries
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1316582957
File Size: 10,27 MB
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What was crime in ancient Rome? Was it defined by law or social attitudes? How did damage to the individual differ from offences against the community as a whole? This book explores competing legal and extra-legal discourses in a number of areas, including theft, official malpractice, treason, sexual misconduct, crimes of violence, homicide, magic and perceptions of deviance. It argues that court practice was responsive to social change, despite the ingrained conservatism of the legal tradition, and that judges and litigants were in part responsible for the harsher operation of justice in Late Antiquity. Consideration is also given to how attitudes to crime were shaped not only by legal experts but also by the rhetorical education and practices of advocates, and by popular and even elite indifference to the finer points of law.

Legitimacy And Law In The Roman World

Author: Elizabeth A. Meyer
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9781139449113
File Size: 50,52 MB
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Greeks wrote mostly on papyrus, but the Romans wrote solemn religious, public and legal documents on wooden tablets often coated with wax. This book investigates the historical significance of this resonant form of writing; its power to order the human realm and cosmos and to make documents efficacious; its role in court; the uneven spread - an aspect of Romanization - of this Roman form outside Italy, as provincials made different guesses as to what would please their Roman overlords; and its influence on the evolution of Roman law. An historical epoch of Roman legal transactions without writing is revealed as a juristic myth of origins. Roman legal documents on tablets are the ancestors of today's dispositive legal documents - the document as the act itself. In a world where knowledge of the Roman law was scarce - and enforcers scarcer - the Roman law drew its authority from a wider world of belief.

Studying Roman Law

Author: Paul du Plessis
Editor: A&C Black
ISBN: 1472503058
File Size: 29,54 MB
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Studying Roman Law is an introductory guide aimed at sixth-formers, students and those with a general interest wishing to obtain a basic overview of Roman private law during the first three centuries of the Common Era. It is not meant to be a replacement for more comprehensive and technical manuals on Roman law, but should rather be seen as introductory reading. Written in non-specialist language, it contains a basic overview of the sources of Roman private law and a guide to their use together with a survey of the main areas of the law using primary sources in translation. It also explains the different contexts in which these rules arose and operated as well as the mechanisms by which they were enforced against the backdrop of one of the most sophisticated and influential legal systems of the ancient world.