Rome Resurgent

Autore: Peter Heather
Editore: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199362769
Grandezza: 42,67 MB
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Between the fall of the western Roman Empire in the fifth century and the collapse of the east in the face of the Arab invasions in the seventh, the remarkable era of the Emperor Justinian (527-568) dominated the Mediterranean region. Famous for his conquests in Italy and North Africa, and for the creation of spectacular monuments such as the Hagia Sophia, his reign was also marked by global religious conflict within the Christian world and an outbreak of plague that some have compared to the Black Death. For many historians, Justinian is far more than an anomaly of Byzantine ambition between the eras of Attila and Muhammad; he is the causal link that binds together the two moments of Roman imperial collapse. Determined to reverse the losses Rome suffered in the fifth century, Justinian unleashed an aggressive campaign in the face of tremendous adversity, not least the plague. This book offers a fundamentally new interpretation of his conquest policy and its overall strategic effect, which has often been seen as imperial overreach, making the regime vulnerable to the Islamic takeover of its richest territories in the seventh century and thus transforming the great Roman Empire of Late Antiquity into its pale shadow of the Middle Ages. In Rome Resurgent, historian Peter Heather draws heavily upon contemporary sources, including the writings of Procopius, the principal historian of the time, while also recasting that author's narrative by bringing together new perspectives based on a wide array of additional source material. A huge body of archaeological evidence has become available for the sixth century, providing entirely new means of understanding the overall effects of Justinian's war policies. Building on his own distinguished work on the Vandals, Goths, and Persians, Heather also gives much fuller coverage to Rome's enemies than Procopius ever did. A briskly paced narrative by a master historian, Rome Resurgent promises to introduce readers to this captivating and unjustly overlooked chapter in ancient warfare.

Hannibal S Last Battle

Autore: Brian Todd Carey
Editore: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 1473814812
Grandezza: 36,19 MB
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Vista: 1240
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A “crisply written, well researched . . . superb piece of scholarship about one of the most dramatic and decisive battles in the ancient world” (Journal of Military History). At Zama (in what is now Tunisia) in 202 BC, the armies of two great empires clashed: the Romans under Scipio Africanus and Carthaginians, led by Hannibal. Scipio’s forces would win a decisive, bloody victory that forever shifted the balance of power in the ancient world. Thereafter, Rome became the dominant civilization of the Mediterranean. Here, Brian Todd Carey recounts that battle and the grueling war that led up to it. He offers fascinating insight into the Carthaginian and Roman methods of waging war, their military organizations, equipment, and the tactics the armies employed. He also delivers an in-depth critical assessment of the contrasting qualities and leadership styles of Hannibal and Scipio, the two most celebrated commanders of their age. With vivid prose and detailed maps of the terrains of the time, Hannibal’s Last Battle is an essential text for fans of military history and students of the classical period.

Masculinity Identity And Power Politics In The Age Of Justinian

Autore: Michael Stewart
Editore: Amsterdam University Press
ISBN: 9048540259
Grandezza: 35,61 MB
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Vista: 6185
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A generation of historians has been captivated by the notorious views on gender found in the mid-sixth century Secret History by the Byzantine historian Procopius of Caesarea. Yet the notable but subtler ways in which gender coloured Procopius' most significant work, the Wars, have received far less attention. This monograph examines how gender shaped the presentation of not only key personalities such as the seminal power-couples Theodora/ Justinian and Antonina/ Belisarius, but also the Persians, Vandals, Goths, Eastern Romans, and Italo-Romans, in both the Wars and the Secret History. By analysing the purpose and rationale behind Procopius' gendered depictions and ethnicizing worldview, this investigation unpicks his knotty agenda. Despite Procopius's reliance on classical antecedents, the gendered discourse that undergirds both texts under investigation must be understood within the broader context of contemporary political debates at a time when control of Italy and North Africa from Constantinople was contested.

A History Of Rome From 753 B C To A D 410

Autore: Cyril Edward Robinson
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 54,87 MB
Formato: PDF, Docs
Vista: 2740
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The Collapse Of Rome

Autore: Gareth C. Sampson
Editore: Pen and Sword
ISBN: 1473826853
Grandezza: 67,92 MB
Formato: PDF, Mobi
Vista: 5011
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The fall and rise of ancient Rome from more than two decades of internal conflict, as its aristocracy took up arms against each other. By the early first century BC, the Roman Republic had already carved itself a massive empire and was easily the most powerful state in the Mediterranean. Roman armies had marched victoriously over enemies far and wide, but the Roman heartland was soon to feel the tramp of armies on campaign as the Republic was convulsed by civil war and rival warlords vied for supremacy, sounding the first death knell of the Republican system. At the center of the conflict was the rivalry between Marius, victor of the Jugurthine and Northern wars, and his former subordinate, Sulla. But, as Gareth Sampson points out in this new analysis, the situation was much more complex than the traditional view portrays it and the scope of the First Civil War both wider and longer. This narrative and analysis of a critical and bloody period in Roman history will make an ideal sequel to the author’s Crisis of Rome (and a prequel to his first book, The Defeat of Rome). “A very readable insight into a period of Roman history that is very important but a mystery to most people.”—Firetrench

The History Of Rome From 753 B C To A D 410

Autore: Cyril Edward Robinson
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 16,70 MB
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Vista: 6328
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Scotland Resurgent

Autore: Paul Henderson Scott
Editore: The Saltire Society
ISBN: 9780854110834
Grandezza: 60,87 MB
Formato: PDF, Docs
Vista: 3134
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Resurgent Antisemitism

Autore: Alvin H. Rosenfeld
Editore: Indiana University Press
ISBN: 0253008905
Grandezza: 31,72 MB
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Vista: 2595
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Dating back millennia, antisemitism has been called "the longest hatred." Thought to be vanquished after the horrors of the Holocaust, in recent decades it has once again become a disturbing presence in many parts of the world. Resurgent Antisemitism presents original research that elucidates the social, intellectual, and ideological roots of the "new" antisemitism and the place it has come to occupy in the public sphere. By exploring the sources, goals, and consequences of today's antisemitism and its relationship to the past, the book contributes to an understanding of this phenomenon that may help diminish its appeal and mitigate its more harmful effects.

Russian Orthodoxy Resurgent

Autore: John Garrard
Editore: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 9781400828999
Grandezza: 76,60 MB
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Vista: 9782
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Russian Orthodoxy Resurgent is the first book to fully explore the expansive and ill-understood role that Russia's ancient Christian faith has played in the fall of Soviet Communism and in the rise of Russian nationalism today. John and Carol Garrard tell the story of how the Orthodox Church's moral weight helped defeat the 1991 coup against Gorbachev launched by Communist Party hardliners. The Soviet Union disintegrated, leaving Russians searching for a usable past. The Garrards reveal how Patriarch Aleksy II--a former KGB officer and the man behind the church's successful defeat of the coup--is reconstituting a new national idea in the church's own image. In the new Russia, the former KGB who run the country--Vladimir Putin among them--proclaim the cross, not the hammer and sickle. Meanwhile, a majority of Russians now embrace the Orthodox faith with unprecedented fervor. The Garrards trace how Aleksy orchestrated this transformation, positioning his church to inherit power once held by the Communist Party and to become the dominant ethos of the military and government. They show how the revived church under Aleksy prevented mass violence during the post-Soviet turmoil, and how Aleksy astutely linked the church with the army and melded Russian patriotism and faith. Russian Orthodoxy Resurgent argues that the West must come to grips with this complex and contradictory resurgence of the Orthodox faith, because it is the hidden force behind Russia's domestic and foreign policies today.

Rome Re Imagined

Autore: Louis I. Hamilton
Editore: BRILL
ISBN: 9004225285
Grandezza: 44,72 MB
Formato: PDF
Vista: 6833
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This collection examines the image of Rome through Arabic, Greek, Hebrew, Latin, and Persian descriptions of the eternal city. Placing the twelfth-century renaissance into a Mediterranean context. The city of Rome is revealed as a multi-vocal object of desire and a contested ideal.

Voices Of Indian Freedom Movement Voice Of Nascent And Resurgent Nationalism

Autore: J. C. Johari
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 39,65 MB
Formato: PDF
Vista: 4281
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Comprises selected speeches, articles, letters, etc. of prominent nationalists of India, 1765-1947.

Nehru And Resurgent Africa

Autore: Hari Sharan Chhabra
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 34,82 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub
Vista: 8360
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The New Encyclopaedia Britannica

Autore: Encyclopaedia Britannica, inc
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 75,98 MB
Formato: PDF
Vista: 2345
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The New Encyclopaedia Britannica Macropaedia Knowledge In Depth

Autore:
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 73,63 MB
Formato: PDF, Kindle
Vista: 4175
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Christendom

Autore: Peter Heather
Editore: Penguin UK
ISBN: 0241215927
Grandezza: 29,28 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Vista: 4900
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In the 4th century AD, a new faith exploded out of Palestine. Overwhelming the paganism of Rome, and converting the Emperor Constantine in the process, it resoundingly defeated a host of other rivals. Almost a thousand years later, all of Europe was controlled by Christian rulers, and the religion, ingrained within culture and society, exercised a hold over its population. This was medieval Christendom: a springboard for the great eras of European colonisation and imperialism that followed. But, Peter Heather shows in this compelling new history, there was nothing inevitable about Christendom's rise and eventual dominance. In exploring how the Christian religion became such a defining feature of the European landscape, and how a small sect of isolated and intensely committed congregations was transformed into a mass movement centrally directed from Rome, Peter Heather shows how Christendom constantly battled against threats both from inside - so-called 'heresies' and other forms of belief. From the crisis that followed the collapse of the Roman empire, which left the religion teetering on the edge of extinction, to the astonishing revolution of the eleventh century onwards in which, using techniques borrowed from Roman law allied with spectacular legal forgery, the Papacy emerged as the head of a vast international corporation, Heather traces Christendom's chameleon-like capacity for self-reinvention. Christendom's achievement was not, or not only, to define official Christianity, but - from its scholars and its lawyers, to its provincial officials and missionaries in far-flung corners of the continent - to transform it into an institution that wielded effective religious authority across virtually the disparate peoples of medieval Europe. This is its extraordinary story.

The Rome That Did Not Fall

Autore: Gerard Friell
Editore: Routledge
ISBN: 1134735456
Grandezza: 74,65 MB
Formato: PDF, Kindle
Vista: 5927
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The Rome that Did Not Fall provides a well-illustrated, comprehensive narrative and analysis of the Roman empire in the east, charting its remarkable growth and development which resulted in the distinct and enduring civilization of Byzantium. It considers: * the fourth century background * the invasions of Attila * the resources of the east * the struggle for stability * the achievements of Anastasius.

The New Encyclopaedia Britannica Macropaedia

Autore:
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 64,90 MB
Formato: PDF, ePub
Vista: 3098
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The New Encyclop Dia Britannica Macrop Dia Knowledge In Depth

Autore:
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 71,48 MB
Formato: PDF, Docs
Vista: 6591
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V.1-12 Micropaedia: Ready reference -- V.13-29 Macropaedia: Knowledge in depth -- V.[30] Propaedia: Outline of knowledge -- V.[31] Index, A-K -- V.[32] Index, L-Z.

Augustinian Studies

Autore:
Editore:
ISBN:
Grandezza: 42,60 MB
Formato: PDF
Vista: 5228
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The Fall Of Carthage

Autore: Adrian Goldsworthy
Editore: Hachette UK
ISBN: 1780223064
Grandezza: 46,48 MB
Formato: PDF, Mobi
Vista: 4635
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The struggle between Rome and Carthage in the Punic Wars was arguably the greatest and most desperate conflict of antiquity. The forces involved and the casualties suffered by both sides were far greater than in any wars fought before the modern era, while the eventual outcome had far-reaching consequences for the history of the Western World, namely the ascendancy of Rome. An epic of war and battle, this is also the story of famous generals and leaders: Hannibal, Fabius Maximus, Scipio Africanus, and his grandson Scipio Aemilianus, who would finally bring down the walls of Carthage.