Postfeminist Digital Cultures

Author: Amy Shields Dobson
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137404205
File Size: 56,13 MB
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This book explores the controversial social media practices engaged in by girls and young women, including sexual self-representations on social network sites, sexting, and self-harm vlogs. Informed by feminist media and cultural studies, Dobson delves beyond alarmist accounts to ask what it is we really fear about these practices.

Self Representation And Digital Culture

Author: N. Thumim
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137265132
File Size: 15,34 MB
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Taking a close look at ordinary people 'telling their own story', Nancy Thumim explores self-representations in contemporary digital culture in settings as diverse as reality TV, online storytelling, and oral histories displayed in museums.

Performing Image

Author: Isobel Harbison
Editor: Mit Press
ISBN: 0262039214
File Size: 31,55 MB
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An examination of how artists have combined performance and moving image for decades, anticipating our changing relation to images in the internet era. In Performing Image, Isobel Harbison examines how artists have combined performance and moving image in their work since the 1960s, and how this work anticipates our changing relations to images since the advent of smart phones and the spread of online prosumerism. Over this period, artists have used a variety of DIY modes of self-imaging and circulation--from home video to social media--suggesting how and why Western subjects might seek alternative platforms for self-expression and self-representation. In the course of her argument, Harbison offers close analyses of works by such artists as Robert Rauschenberg, Yvonne Rainer, Mark Leckey, Wu Tsang, and Martine Syms. Harbison argues that while we produce images, images also produce us--those that we take and share, those that we see and assimilate through mass media and social media, those that we encounter in museums and galleries. Although all the artists she examines express their relation to images uniquely, they also offer a vantage point on today's productive-consumptive image circuits in which billions of us are caught. This unregulated, all-encompassing image performativity, Harbison writes, puts us to work, for free, in the service of global corporate expansion. Harbison offers a three-part interpretive framework for understanding this new proximity to images as it is negotiated by these artworks, a detailed outline of a set of connected practices--and a declaration of the value of art in an economy of attention and a crisis of representation.

Global Digital Cultures

Author: Aswin Punathambekar
Editor: University of Michigan Press
ISBN: 0472131400
File Size: 62,30 MB
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Digital media histories are part of a global network, and South Asia is a key nexus in shaping the trajectory of digital media in the twenty-first century. Digital platforms like Facebook, WhatsApp, and others are deeply embedded in the daily lives of millions of people around the world, shaping how people engage with others as kin, as citizens, and as consumers. Moving away from Anglo-American and strictly national frameworks, the essays in this book explore the intersections of local, national, regional, and global forces that shape contemporary digital culture(s) in regions like South Asia: the rise of digital and mobile media technologies, the ongoing transformation of established media industries, and emergent forms of digital media practice and use that are reconfiguring sociocultural, political, and economic terrains across the Indian subcontinent. From massive state-driven digital identity projects and YouTube censorship to Tinder and dating culture, from Twitter and primetime television to Facebook and political rumors, Global Digital Cultures focuses on enduring concerns of representation, identity, and power while grappling with algorithmic curation and data-driven processes of production, circulation, and consumption.

Album Verses And Romantic Literary Culture

Author: Samantha Matthews
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0198857942
File Size: 22,77 MB
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This is the first book to tell the story of the Romantic album and its original poetry. It rediscovers a huge number of overlooked Romantic poems, and reconstructs how albums and their owners were represented in print

The Photographic Image In Digital Culture

Author: Martin Lister
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 113616264X
File Size: 78,65 MB
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What does a new technology of images mean for the ways in which we encounter and use images in everyday life: in advertising, entertainment, news, evidence? And within our domestic and private worlds for our sense of self and indentity; our view of the body and our sexuality? The Photographic Image in Digital Culture explores the technological transformation of the image and its implications for photography. Contributors investigate such issues as the relationship of technological change to visual culture; the new discourses of `techno-culture'; medicine's new vision of the body, and interactive pornography. They also examine the cultural meanings of new surveillance images; shifts in the domestic consumption of images and their relationship to memory, history and biography; the social uses of video and computer games and the changing role of photography as document and as art.

Creativity Cognition

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 28,28 MB
Format: PDF
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Cinematic Perspectives On Digital Culture

Author: Norman Taylor
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137284625
File Size: 29,81 MB
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Exploring research into mobile phone use as props to subjective identity, Norman Taylor employs concepts from Michelle Foucault, Gilles Deleuze and actor network theory to discuss the affect of mechanisms of make-believe, from celebrity culture to avatar-obsessed game players, and digital culture.

Self Spectacle Online The Construction And Representation Of Identity In Contemporary Digital Culture

Author: Mayanna Framroze
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 10,80 MB
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Given the ubiquity and pervasiveness of digital technologies within contemporary society, scholarly exploration about how life is lived in this digital era is critical in order to understand the impact upon our lives, as well as upon society. One aspect of living a digitally oriented life involves how and why one represents oneself in virtual environments, and how one interacts with others within the digital ecosystem. As individuals spend more time online, their interactions, perceptions, and behaviors -- even their sense of self -- are shaped by new technologies as well as by the social contexts within which these manifest. Understanding this is particularly relevant for educators, as they engage with students who are increasingly conversant with technologies, and whose life experiences may best be appreciated, by educators, if grounded within a broader sensibility about digital life. This study focuses on how and more critically why the self is constructed and presented as it is within online environments. In order to assess this, particularly from the perspective of those emplaced within this mode of living, this inquiry is situated at the intersection of three scholarly disciplines. Thus, this study draws from the following theoretical frameworks: a constructivist developmental approach emanating from social psychology, wherein symbolic interactionism and performativity are invoked; a communication studies approach that considers how technologies mediate identity representation and interaction; and a critical cultural studies perspective that examines media culture, with a particular emphasis on the role of spectacle within society. This study presents the results of qualitative research that examines the online self-representations of 12 students at a large urban university in Los Angeles. This study also employs a longitudinal approach, as five of these 12 participants have been observed for a period of nearly two years, and comparative assessments of their activities as well as their own interpretations of the same have occurred over this time period. Since the primary focus of this study is to enable understanding regarding the motivations, meanings, and value associated with self representation online, it is necessary to derive these insights directly from participants themselves. As such, interviews have been conducted with all participants, and in some cases, more than once. The findings of this research reveal four broad patterns that address how and why participants construct their online identity representations. They do so 1) to enhance their employment prospects; 2) to position themselves in a particular light to formulate a self-brand; 3) to engage socially with others; and 4) to engender feelings of self-worth from which they derive feelings of self-satisfaction, among other positive emotional benefits. In consideration of these self-representation, this study further proposes a new theorization with which to frame these findings. It proposes that what is occurring might be viewed as a form of self-spectacle, one that derives its foundation from previous iterations of societal spectacle, inclusive of some of the tenets of broader spectacle, yet is distinct, given its singular focus on the individual. It is suggested that this micro-level spectacle instantiates in the myriad shapes online self-representation assumes today and, if the rapid adoption of self-facing technologies is any indication, is likely to continue unabated. As such, this study contributes to the emerging scholarship regarding life lived online, and offers a perspective that attempts to contextualize what is occurring during this contemporary moment.

Gender And Relatability In Digital Culture

Author: Akane Kanai
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 3319915150
File Size: 70,78 MB
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This book explores the practices and the politics of relatable femininity in intimate digital social spaces. Examining a GIF-based digital culture on Tumblr, the author considers how young women produce relatability through humorous, generalisable representations of embarrassment, frustration, and resilience in everyday situations. Relatability is examined as an affective relation that offers the feeling of sameness and female friendship amongst young women. However, this relation is based on young women’s ability to competently negotiate the ‘feeling rules’ that govern youthful femininity. Such classed and racialised feeling rules require young women to perfect the performance of normalcy: they must mix self-deprecation with positivity; they must be relatably flawed but not actual ‘failures’. Situated in debates about postfeminism, self-representation and digital identity, this book connects understandings of digital visual culture to gender, race, and class, and neoliberal imperatives to perform the ‘right feelings’. Gender and Relatability in Digital Culture will be of interest to students and scholars across a range of disciplines including gender studies, cultural studies, sociology, and media studies.

American Indian Quarterly

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 48,37 MB
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Revitalising Audience Research

Author: Frauke Zeller
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317649451
File Size: 54,69 MB
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The revitalisation of audience studies is not only about new approaches and methods; it entails a crossing of disciplines and a bridging of long-established boundaries in the field. The aim of this volume is to capture the boundary-crossing processes that have begun to emerge across the discipline in the form of innovative, interdisciplinary interventions in the audience research agenda. Contributions to this volume seek to further this process though innovative, audience-oriented perspectives that firmly anchor media engagement within the diversity of contexts and purposes to which people incorporate media in their daily lives, in ways often unanticipated by industries and professionals.

Is Regulation Still An Option In A Digital Universe

Author: Tim Lees
Editor: John Libbey & Company Limited
ISBN:
File Size: 56,91 MB
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These papers from the 30th University of Manchester International Broadcasting Symposium feature contributions from major figures in the worlds of broadcasting and academia. They explore the proliferation of new, supposedly unregulated media like the Internet; the opening up of broadcasting through digital technology; and the increasingly international nature of the broadcasting medium itself. The legal, economic, and technological issues that now take precedence are detailed.

Digital Cultures And The Politics Of Emotion

Author: Athina Karatzogianni
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 0230391346
File Size: 27,55 MB
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Fifteen thought-provoking essays engage in an innovative dialogue between cultural studies of affect, feelings and emotions, and digital cultures, new media and technology. The volume provides a fascinating dialogue that cuts across disciplines, media platforms and geographic and linguistic boundaries.

Self Re Presentation Now

Author: Nancy Thumim
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 9780367582418
File Size: 70,16 MB
Format: PDF
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Questions of presentation and representation of individuals, groups, and communities have become key sites of struggle, as evidenced by the battles in both physical and digital spaces - battles which have also thrown the roles of digital affordances, systems, industries, and structures into relief. This book shows that questions about the (re)presentation of the self in digital culture are now key to how the field of media and communication must engage with the political; and demonstrates the wide range of scholarship focusing on presentation and representation of the self in recent times. The contributors show that questions of self-presentation and representation in digital culture are the focus of lively debate, critique, and investigation and that this is taking place from a number of theoretical perspectives and locations across the globe. This book was originally published as a special issue of Popular Communication.

Structures Of Participation In Digital Culture

Author: Joe Karaganis
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 80,52 MB
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Media Studies.

Screen Methods

Author: Jacqueline Furby
Editor: Wallflower Press
ISBN:
File Size: 63,66 MB
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'Screen Methods' is a collection of essays that aims to look at the way in which the theory of film studies, an increasingly popular subject at universities, is approached both historically and in the 21st century.

Parallax

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 57,86 MB
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Digital Youth

Author: Jonathan Alexander
Editor: Hampton Press (NJ)
ISBN:
File Size: 40,29 MB
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Argues that the youth use the Web to experiment with and deploy a number of rhetorical strategies that tell about their vision for the communications technologies and the literacy practices they use to engage that technology. This book aims to offer a portrait of the future use of communications technologies, particularly the Web.

Digital Culture

Author: National Preservation Office
Editor: London : National Preservation Office, The British Library
ISBN:
File Size: 54,11 MB
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A synthesis of JISC/NPO studies on the preservation of electronic materials.