Shakespeare Rhetoric And Cognition

Author: Raphael Lyne
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1139501445
File Size: 48,12 MB
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Raphael Lyne addresses a crucial Shakespearean question: why do characters in the grip of emotional crises deliver such extraordinarily beautiful and ambitious speeches? How do they manage to be so inventive when they are perplexed? Their dense, complex, articulate speeches at intensely dramatic moments are often seen as psychological - they uncover and investigate inwardness, character and motivation - and as rhetorical - they involve heightened language, deploying recognisable techniques. Focusing on A Midsummer Night's Dream, Othello, Cymbeline and the Sonnets, Lyne explores both the psychological and rhetorical elements of Shakespeare's language. In the light of cognitive linguistics and cognitive literary theory he shows how Renaissance rhetoric could be considered a kind of cognitive science, an attempt to map out the patterns of thinking. His study reveals how Shakespeare's metaphors and similes work to think, interpret and resolve, and how their struggle to do so results in extraordinary poetry.

Shakespeare And Cognition

Author: N. Parvini
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 1137543167
File Size: 63,57 MB
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Shakespeare and Cognition challenges orthodox approaches to Shakespeare by using recent psychological findings about human decision-making to analyse the unique characters that populate his plays. It aims to find a way to reconnect readers and watchers of Shakespeare's plays to the fundamental questions that first animated them. Why does Othello succumb so easily to Iago's manipulations? Why does Anne allow herself to be wooed by Richard III, the man who killed her husband and father? Why does Macbeth go from being a seemingly reasonable man to a cold-blooded killer? Why does Hamlet take so long to kill Claudius? This book aims to answer these questions from a fresh perspective.

Shakespeare Studies Vol 42

Author: James R. Siemon
Editor: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
ISBN: 0838644740
File Size: 40,55 MB
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An annual volume containing essays and studies by critics and cultural historians from around the world. Also includes two review articles and thirteen books reviews.

Memory And Intertextuality In Renaissance Literature

Author: Raphael Lyne
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 131603335X
File Size: 68,62 MB
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This book uses theories of memory derived from cognitive science to offer new ways of understanding how literary works remember other literary works. Using terms derived from psychology – implicit and explicit memory, interference and forgetting – Raphael Lyne shows how works by Renaissance writers such as Wyatt, Shakespeare, Jonson, and Milton interact with their sources. The poems and plays in question are themselves sources of insight into the workings of memory, sharing and anticipating some scientific categories in the process of their thinking. Lyne proposes a way forward for cognitive approaches to literature, in which both experiments and texts are valued as contributors to interdisciplinary questions. His book will interest researchers and upper-level students of renaissance literature and drama, Shakespeare studies, memory studies, and classical reception.

Dissertation Abstracts International

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 26,88 MB
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Stylistics And Shakespeare S Language

Author: Mireille Ravassat
Editor: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441184279
File Size: 61,13 MB
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This innovative volume testifies to the current revived interest in Shakespeare's language and style and opens up new and captivating vistas of investigation. Transcending old boundaries between literary and linguistic studies, this engaging collaborative book comes up with an original array of theoretical approaches and new findings. The chapters in the collection capture a rich diversity of points of view and cover such fields as lexicography, versification, dramaturgy, rhetorical analyses, cognitive and computational corpus-based stylistic studies, offering a holistic vision of Shakespeare's uses of language. The perspective is deliberately broad, confronting ideas and visions at the intersection of various techniques of textual investigation. Such novel explorations of Shakespeare's multifarious artistry and amazing inventiveness in his use of language will cater for a broad range of readers, from undergraduates, postgraduates, scholars and researchers, to poetry and theatre lovers alike.

Architectural Rhetoric In Shakespeare And Spenser

Author: Jennifer C. Vaught
Editor: Research in Medieval and Early
ISBN: 9781501517938
File Size: 40,37 MB
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This book discusses how Shakespeare and Spenser configure the body and mind as a besieged castle or house; a walled city vulnerable to ruin; or as a built environment surrounded by the elements of earth, air, fire, or water. Building on current approaches to the subject of place and movement in terms of cognitive theory, anthropology, and ecology, Jennifer C. Vaught illustrates how rhetoric of architecture and the built environment in Shakespeare and Spenser provides a figurative bridge between the body, mind, and material, nonhuman world of stone and timber. Glancing back at the literary tradition of medieval architectural allegory exemplified by The Castle of Perseverance, she examines figures of the besieged castle and other fortified, yet permeable walled structures representing the body and mind in Shakespeare's histories, Roman plays, tragedies, romances, a problem comedy, and Sonnets and in Spenser's Faerie Queene and Complaints.

Rebirth Of Rhetoric

Author: Richard Andrews
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 0415694256
File Size: 39,28 MB
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Rebirth of Rhetoric brings together contributions from several fields to provide a forum in which a unifying theory for language and literature studies can be debated.The book does not aim to resurrect classical Renaissance rhetoric, but to remake it within a contemporary context. The context of texts (both spoken and written) is one of the main emphases of this collection, whether it is the ideology informing the text, or the way in which a text is transformed by its audience. The book also aims to present a range of practical approaches to the study of texts of all kinds: literary; televisual; film and photography. It also argues the case for developments in the Arts and Humanities which will bring together people working in Education, Linguistics, Composition, Literature and Cultural Studies.

Shakespeare

Author: Harold Bloom
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 18,62 MB
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America's uncontested expert on Shakespeare and author of The Western Canon presents a monumental analysis of each one of the Bard's plays, designed to show that Shakespeare invented human nature and personality as we understand it today.

Shakespearean Criticism

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 31,14 MB
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Rhetorical Psychological And Structural Use Of Paradox In Shakespeare S Love S Labour S Lost And Measure For Measure

Author: Daniel Paul Schlosky
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 43,59 MB
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Cognition Comprehension And Communication

Author: Wolfgang Mieder
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 17,25 MB
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Compilation of 23 essays on proverbs by North American scholars published from 1990-2000.

Shakespeare And The Origins Of English

Author: Neil Rhodes
Editor: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 9780199235933
File Size: 34,59 MB
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What existed before there was a subject known as English? How did English eventually come about? Focusing specifically on Shakespeare's role in the origins of the subject, Rhodes addresses the evolution of English from the early modern period up to the late eighteenth century. He deals with the kinds of literary and educational practices that would have formed Shakespeare's experience and shaped his work and traces the origins of English in certain aspects of the educational regime that existed before English literature became an established part of the curriculum. Rhodes then presents Shakespeare both as a product of Renaissance rhetorical teaching and as an agent of the transformation of rhetoric in the eighteenth century into the subject that emerged as the modern study of English. By transferring terms from contemporary disciplines, such as 'media studies' and 'creative writing', or the technology of computing, to earlier cultural contexts Rhodes aims both to invite further reflection on the nature of the practices themselves, and also to offer new ways of thinking about their relationship to the discipline of English. Shakespeare and the Origins of English attempts not only an explanation of where English came from, but suggests how some of the things that we do now in the name of 'English' might usefully be understood in a wider historical perspective. By extending our view of its past, we may achieve a clearer view of its future.

The Cambridge Companion To Shakespeare S Language

Author: Lynne Magnusson
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107131936
File Size: 63,82 MB
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Illuminates the pleasures and challenges of Shakespeare's complex language for today's students, teachers, actors and theatre-goers.

Shakespeare And The Origins Of English

Author: Neil Rhodes
Editor: Oxford University Press on Demand
ISBN: 9780199245727
File Size: 62,79 MB
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What existed before there was a subject known as English? How did English eventually come about? Focusing specifically on Shakespeare's role in the origins of the subject, Rhodes addresses the evolution of English from the early modern period up to the late eighteenth century. He deals with the kinds of literary and educational practices that would have formed Shakespeare's experience and shaped his work and traces the origins of English in certain aspects of the educational regime that existed before English literature became an established part of the curriculum. Rhodes then presents Shakespeare both as a product of Renaissance rhetorical teaching and as an agent of the transformation of rhetoric in the eighteenth century into the subject that emerged as the modern study of English. By transferring terms from contemporary disciplines, such as 'media studies' and 'creative writing', or the technology of computing, to earlier cultural contexts Rhodes aims both to invite further reflection on the nature of the practices themselves, and also to offer new ways of thinking about their relationship to the discipline of English. Shakespeare and the Origins of English attempts not only an explanation of where English came from, but suggests how some of the things that we do now in the name of 'English' might usefully be understood in a wider historical perspective. By extending our view of its past, we may achieve a clearer view of its future.

Shakespeare Quarterly

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 10,57 MB
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Principles Of Rhetoric

Author: Richard E. Hughes
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 46,52 MB
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The Work Of Fiction

Author: Alan Richardson
Editor: Routledge
ISBN:
File Size: 26,95 MB
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The essays gathered here demonstrate and justify the excitement and promise of cognitive historicism, providing a lively introduction to this new and quickly growing area of literary studies. Written by eight leading critics whose work has done much to establish the new field, they display the significant results of a largely unprecedented combination of cultural and cognitive analysis. The authors explore both narrative and dramatic genres, uncovering the tensions among presumably universal cognitive processes, and the local contexts within which complex literary texts are produced. Alan Richardson's opening essay evaluates current approaches to the study of literature and cognition, locating them on the map of recent literary studies, indicating their most compelling developments to date, and suggesting the most promising future directions. The seven essays that follow provide innovative readings of topics ranging from Shakespeare (Othello, Macbeth, Cymbeline, The Rape of Lucrece) through Samuel Richardson's Clarissa, to contemporary authors Ian McEwan and Gilbert Sorrentino. They underscore some of the limitations of new historicist and post-structuralist approaches to literary cultural studies while affirming the value of supplementing rather than supplanting them with insights and methods drawn from cognitive and evolutionary theory. Together, they demonstrate the analytical power of considering these texts in the context of recent studies of cultural universals, 'theory of mind, ' cognitive categorization and genre, and neural-materialist theories of language and consciousness. This groundbreaking collection holds appeal for a broad audience, including students and teachers of literary theory, literary history, cultural studies, and literature and science studies.

Cognitive Psychology

Author: Darlene V. Howard
Editor: MacMillan Publishing Company
ISBN:
File Size: 33,83 MB
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Shakespeare Performance Studies

Author: W. B. Worthen
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107055954
File Size: 37,52 MB
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This book looks at Shakespeare through performance, capturing the dialogue between performance, Shakespeare, and contemporary concerns in the humanities.