Shakespeare S Bawdy

Author: Eric Partridge
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1134522096
Size: 12,77 MB
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This classic of Shakespeare scholarship begins with a masterly introductory essay analysing and exemplifying the various categories of sexual and non-sexual bawdy expressions and allusions in Shakespeare's plays and sonnets. The main body of the work consists of an alphabetical glossary of all words and phrases used in a sexual or scatological sense, with full explanations and cross-references.

Stylistics And Shakespeare S Language

Author: Mireille Ravassat
Editor: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441184279
Size: 13,36 MB
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This innovative volume testifies to the current revived interest in Shakespeare's language and style and opens up new and captivating vistas of investigation. Transcending old boundaries between literary and linguistic studies, this engaging collaborative book comes up with an original array of theoretical approaches and new findings. The chapters in the collection capture a rich diversity of points of view and cover such fields as lexicography, versification, dramaturgy, rhetorical analyses, cognitive and computational corpus-based stylistic studies, offering a holistic vision of Shakespeare's uses of language. The perspective is deliberately broad, confronting ideas and visions at the intersection of various techniques of textual investigation. Such novel explorations of Shakespeare's multifarious artistry and amazing inventiveness in his use of language will cater for a broad range of readers, from undergraduates, postgraduates, scholars and researchers, to poetry and theatre lovers alike.

Shakespeare S Agonistic Comedy

Author: G. Beiner
Editor: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
ISBN: 9780838634677
Size: 17,14 MB
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Shakespeare's Agonistic Comedy focuses on one of the three comic strategies deployed and explored by Shakespeare in his comedies from Errors to Twelfth Night: the essentially punitive strategy, which author G. Beiner labels "agonistic," and which is distinguished from the essentially reparative "comedy of love" as well as from the perspective of folly. In one respect, the purpose of this book is to define the characteristics and to map the canon of Shakespeare's agonistic comedy; in other words, to provide a poetics. Such a task has its own importance and preliminary value if fundamental patterns and functions have not been recognized as such in the critical analysis of a body of texts. Part I of Shakespeare's Agonistic Comedy identifies the structural characteristics of the provisionally outlined canon, focuses on apparently borderline cases (Petruchio and Katherina, Benedick and Beatrice, Jaques and Don John, as well as that of Love's Labour's Lost) in order to define the canon more precisely, defines the distinctive perspective generated by agonistic comedy, and examines the thematic and referential patterns that may appear prima facie to be characteristic of this comedy: violence and revenge. Throughout this section dealing with poetics, Beiner emphasizes that agonistic comedy is capable of being self-complete and independent and yet in Shakespearean comedy it never generates an entire play; nor does it appear in every play from Errors to Twelfth Night. A poetics of Shakespeare's agonistic comedy is necessarily related to the wider field of a poetics of Shakespearean comedy, which in turn is related to the even wider area of comic traditions. As the poetics is based on the texts (not derived by deduction or theoretical extension from some principle of poetics), so it is applied as a tool of analysis to the texts and used in conjunction with evaluation. The underlying assumption is that the task of poetics is instrumental, and that its usefulness has to be demonstrated and verified in practice. Hence, the division of the book into two parts. As Part I formulates a poetics on the basis of the texts, so Part II applies the poetics to the major texts - always within the dynamics of the multiple-plot and multi-layered perspective on a play. Part II focuses in detail on The Merry Wives of Windsor, The Merchant of Venice, and Twelfth Night, analyzing the agons and placing them in relation to the comedy of love and the perspective of folly.

Shakespeare S Tremor And Orwell S Cough

Author: John J. Ross, MD
Editor: St. Martin's Press
ISBN: 1250012074
Size: 16,18 MB
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The doctor suddenly appeared beside Will, startling him. He was sleek and prosperous, with a dainty goatee. Though he smiled reassuringly, the poet noticed that he kept a safe distance. In a soothing, urbane voice, the physician explained the treatment: stewed prunes to evacuate the bowels; succulent meats to ease digestion; cinnabar and the sweating tub to cleanse the disease from the skin. The doctor warned of minor side effects: uncontrolled drooling, fetid breath, bloody gums, shakes and palsies. Yet desperate diseases called for desperate remedies, of course. Were Shakespeare's shaky handwriting, his obsession with venereal disease, and his premature retirement connected? Did John Milton go blind from his propaganda work for the Puritan dictator Oliver Cromwell, as he believed, or did he have a rare and devastating complication of a very common eye problem? Did Jonathan Swift's preoccupation with sex and filth result from a neurological condition that might also explain his late-life surge in creativity? What Victorian plague wiped out the entire Brontë family? What was the cause of Nathaniel Hawthorne's sudden demise? Were Herman Melville's disabling attacks of eye and back pain the product of "nervous affections," as his family and physicians believed, or did he actually have a malady that was unknown to medical science until well after his death? Was Jack London a suicide, or was his death the product of a series of self-induced medical misadventures? Why did W. B. Yeats's doctors dose him with toxic amounts of arsenic? Did James Joyce need several horrific eye operations because of a strange autoimmune disease acquired from a Dublin streetwalker? Did writing Nineteen Eighty-Four actually kill George Orwell? The Bard meets House, M.D. in this fascinating untold story of the impact of disease on the lives and works of some the finest writers in the English language. In Shakespeare's Tremor and Orwell's Cough, John Ross cheerfully debunks old biographical myths and suggests fresh diagnoses for these writers' real-life medical mysteries. The author takes us way back, when leeches were used for bleeding and cupping was a common method of cure, to a time before vaccinations, sterilized scalpels, or real drug regimens. With a healthy dose of gross descriptions and a deep love for the literary output of these ten greats, Ross is the doctor these writers should have had in their time of need.

Shakespeare S Sexual Language

Author: Gordon Williams
Editor: A&C Black
ISBN: 0826491340
Size: 17,10 MB
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Focuses on Shakespeare's sexual language, some of which is notoriously difficult to unravel and whose roots go back into earlier literature. This is a comprehensive but concise reference guide to sexual language and imagery in Shakespeare.

William Shakespeare The Complete Works

Author: William Shakespeare
Editor: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191608394
Size: 11,43 MB
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The second Oxford edition of Shakespeare's Complete Works reconsiders every detail of their text and presentation in the light of modern scholarship. The nature and authority of the early documents are re-examined, and the canon and chronological order of composition freshly established. Spelling and punctuation are modernized, and there is a brief introduction to each work, as well as an illuminating and informative General Introduction. Included here for the first time is the play The Reign of King Edward the Third as well as the full text of Sir Thomas More. This new edition also features an essay on Shakespeare's language by David Crystal, and a bibliography of foundational works.

The New Cambridge Bibliography Of English Literature Volume 1 600 1660

Author: George Watson
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521200042
Size: 13,62 MB
Format: PDF
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More than fifty specialists have contributed to this new edition of volume 1 of The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature. The design of the original work has established itself so firmly as a workable solution to the immense problems of analysis, articulation and coordination that it has been retained in all its essentials for the new edition. The task of the new contributors has been to revise and integrate the lists of 1940 and 1957, to add materials of the following decade, to correct and refine the bibliographical details already available, and to re-shape the whole according to a new series of conventions devised to give greater clarity and consistency to the entries.

Shakespeare And The Arts Of Language

Author: Russ McDonald
Editor: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191037192
Size: 13,79 MB
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Oxford Shakespeare Topics provide students and teachers with short books on important aspects of Shakespeare criticism and scholarship. Each book is written by an authority in its field, and combines accessible style with original discussion of its subject. Notes and a critical guide to further reading equip the interested reader with the means to broaden research. For the modern reader or playgoer, English as Shakespeare used it can seem alien and puzzling: vocabulary and grammar are in transition, pronouns and verb-forms can seem unfamiliar. Moreover, the conventions of poetic drama may also pose an impediment. Shakespeare and the Arts of Language provides a clear and helpful guide to the linguistic and rhetorical dimensions of the plays and poems. Written in a lucid, non-technical style, the book starts with the story of how the English language changed throughout the sixteenth century. Subsequent chapters define Shakespeare's main artistic tools and illustrate their poetic and theatrical contributions: Renaissance rhetoric, imagery and metaphor, blank verse, prose speech, and wordplay. The conclusion surveys Shakespeare's multiple and often conflicting ideas about language, encompassing both his enthusiasm at what words can do for us and his suspicion of what words can do to us. Throughout, Russ McDonald helps his readers to appreciate a play's concerns and theatrical effects by thinking about its language in relation to other writings of the period. He also emphasizes pleasure in the physical properties of Shakespeare's words: their colour, weight, and texture, the appeal of verbal patterns, and the irresistible power of intensified language.

The Cambridge Companion To Shakespeare

Author: Ed. de Grazia
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 9780521658812
Size: 15,62 MB
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A comprehensive, readable and authoritative introduction to the study of Shakespeare.

100 Things You Re Not Supposed To Know

Author: Kick, Russ
Editor: Disinformation Books
ISBN: 1938875087
Size: 19,88 MB
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This book sheds light on those things that people in power—government, religious leaders, corporations, the rich and well connected—would just as soon wish you didn't know. To them secrets are power. And they'll do whatever it takes to keep them that way—suppressing the truth and covering up facts that might make the rest of us angry enough to challenge the powerful or at least to have a good laugh at their expense. Using careful research and impeccable sources, Kick uncovers the hidden truth. For example, self-appointed censors warn constantly about the dangers of pornography, but the fact is that pornography has existed since the first cave people carved dirty pictures on the walls. It's also true that two atomic bombs were dropped on North Carolina—although we managed to avoid nuking Greenland, Texas, Canada, Britain and Spain; George Washington embezzled government funds; 1 of 10 people is not fathered by the man they believe is dad; Barbie is based on a German sex doll; The American colonists practiced cannibalism, and much more. This is a combined edition of 50 Things You're Not Supposed to Know, volumes 1 and 2 first published in 2003 and 2004.