Situational Judgment Tests

Author: Jeff A. Weekley
Editor: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1134812493
Size: 19,16 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 290
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Situational Judgment Tests advances the science and practice of SJTs by promoting a theoretical framework, providing an understanding of best practices, and establishing a research agenda for years to come. Currently, there is no other source that provides such a comprehensive treatment of situational judgment testing. Key features of this book include: chapters rich with theoretical insights and future research possibilities; numerous implications for improving the practical applications of SJTs, which include not only SJT development and scoring, but also operational issues affecting test administration and interpretation; comprehensive summaries of published and unpublished SJT research; and chapters that address topics that are timely and current, such as issues involving the international application of SJTs and technological considerations. This text is relevant for academics, practitioners, and students of human resource management, organizational behavior, management, and industrial/organizational psychology. This book is new in SIOP's Organizational Frontiers Series, publications of the Society of Industrial and Organizational Psychology.

Proceedings Of The 12th International Conference On Measurement And Quality Control Cyber Physical Issue

Author: Vidosav D. Majstorovic
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 3030181774
Size: 10,38 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 567
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Judgment And Decision Making At Work

Author: Scott Highhouse
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1135021945
Size: 10,92 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 342
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Employees are constantly making decisions and judgments that have the potential to affect themselves, their families, their work organizations, and on some occasion even the broader societies in which they live. A few examples include: deciding which job applicant to hire, setting a production goal, judging one’s level of job satisfaction, deciding to steal from the cash register, agreeing to help organize the company’s holiday party, forecasting corporate tax rates two years later, deciding to report a coworker for sexual harassment, and predicting the level of risk inherent in a new business venture. In other words, a great many topics of interest to organizational researchers ultimately reduce to decisions made by employees. Yet, numerous entreaties notwithstanding, industrial and organizational psychologists typically have not incorporated a judgment and decision-making perspective in their research. The current book begins to remedy the situation by facilitating cross-pollination between the disciplines of organizational psychology and decision-making. The book describes both laboratory and more “naturalistic” field research on judgment and decision-making, and applies it to core topics of interest to industrial and organizational psychologists: performance appraisal, employee selection, individual differences, goals, leadership, teams, and stress, among others. The book also suggests ways in which industrial and organizational psychology research can benefit the discipline of judgment and decision-making. The authors of the chapters in this book conduct research at the intersection of organizational psychology and decision-making, and consequently are uniquely positioned to bridging the divide between the two disciplines.