The Lost Plays Of Greek Tragedy Volume 1

Author: Matthew Wright
Editor: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472567773
File Size: 58,55 MB
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Numerous books have been written about Greek tragedy, but almost all of them are concerned with the 32 plays that still survive. This book, by contrast, concentrates on the plays that no longer exist. Hundreds of tragedies were performed in Athens and further afield during the classical period, and even though nearly all are lost, a certain amount is known about them through fragments and other types of evidence. Matthew Wright offers an authoritative two-volume critical introduction and guide to the lost tragedies. This first volume examines the remains of works by playwrights such as Phrynichus, Agathon, Neophron, Critias, Astydamas, Chaeremon, and many others who have been forgotten or neglected. (Volume 2 explores the lost works of Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides.) What types of evidence exist for lost tragedies, and how might we approach this evidence? How did these plays become lost or incompletely preserved? How can we explain why all tragedians except Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides became neglected or relegated to the status of 'minor' poets? What changes and continuities can be detected in tragedy after the fifth century BC? Can the study of lost works and neglected authors change our views of Greek tragedy as a genre? This book answers such questions through a detailed study of the fragments in their historical and literary context. Including English versions of previously untranslated fragments as well as in-depth discussion of their significance, The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy makes these works accessible for the first time.
The Lost Plays of Greek Tragedy (Volume 1)
Language: en
Pages: 312
Authors: Matthew Wright
Categories: Drama
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-11-03 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Numerous books have been written about Greek tragedy, but almost all of them are concerned with the 32 plays that still survive. This book, by contrast, concentrates on the plays that no longer exist. Hundreds of tragedies were performed in Athens and further afield during the classical period, and even
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Pages: 592
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Categories: Classical languages
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This rich collection of essays by an international group of scholars explores commentaries in many different languages on ancient Latin and Greek texts. The commentaries discussed range from the ancient world to the twentieth century. The volume pays particular attention to individual commentaries, national traditions of commentary, the part played
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Language: en
Pages: 280
Authors: Rosie Wyles
Categories: History
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Language: en
Pages: 1029
Authors: James Clerk Maxwell
Categories: Biography & Autobiography
Type: BOOK - Published: 1990 - Publisher: CUP Archive

This second volume of James Clerk Maxwell's correspondence and manuscript papers begins in mid-1862 with his first reference reports for the Royal Society, and concludes in December 1873 shortly before the formal inauguration of the Cavendish Laboratory. The documents describe his involvement with the wider scientific community in Victorian Britain,
A Referential Commentary and Lexicon to Homer, Iliad VIII
Language: en
Pages: 528
Authors: Adrian Kelly
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-02-22 - Publisher: OUP Oxford

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