Sweeney Astray

Author: Seamus Heaney
Editor: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1466855800
Size: 20,96 MB
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Sweeney Astray is Seamus Heaney's version of the medieval Irish work Buile Suibne. Its hero, Mad Sweeney, undergoes a series of purgatorial adventures after he is cursed by a saint and turned into a bird at the Battle of Moira. Heaney's translation not only restores to us a work of historical and literary importance but offers the genius of one of our greatest living poets to reinforce its claims on the reader of contemporary literature.

Sweeney Astray

Author: Seamus Heaney
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 20,61 MB
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The Oxford History Of The Irish Book Volume V

Author: Clare Hutton
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199249113
Size: 18,36 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Part of a series providing an authoritative history of the book in Ireland, this volume comprehensively outlines the history of 20th-century Irish book culture. This book embraces all the written and printed traditions and heritages of Ireland and places them in the global context of a worldwide interest in book histories.

Modern Poetry And Ethnography

Author: S. Heuston
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 0230119875
Size: 20,25 MB
Format: PDF
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This study maps a new approach to the works of W.B. Yeats, Robert Frost, Robert Penn Warren, and Seamus Heaney. Sean Heuston combines interdisciplinary analysis, specifically ethnography, with close reading, and in so doing argues provocatively for the intersection of modern poetry studies and contemporary ethnographic theory.

District And Circle

Author: Seamus Heaney
Editor: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1466855495
Size: 10,68 MB
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Seamus Heaney's new collection starts "In an age of bare hands and cast iron" and ends as "The automatic lock / clunks shut" in the eerie new conditions of a menaced twenty-first century. In their haunted, almost visionary clarity, the poems assay the weight and worth of what has been held in the hand and in the memory. Images out of a childhood spent safe from the horrors of World War II – railway sleepers, a sledgehammer, the "heavyweight / Silence" of "Cattle out in rain" – are colored by a strongly contemporary sense that "Anything can happen," and other images from the dangerous present – a journey on the Underground, a melting glacier – are fraught with this same anxiety. But District and Circle, which includes a number of prose poems and translations, offers resistance as the poet gathers his staying powers and stands his ground in the hiding places of love and excited language. In a sequence like "The Tollund Man in Springtime" and in several poems which "do the rounds of the district" – its known roads and rivers and trees, its familiar and unfamiliar ghosts – the gravity of memorial is transformed into the grace of recollection. With more relish and conviction than ever, Seamus Heaney maintains his trust in the obduracy of workaday realities and the mystery of everyday renewals. District and Circle is the winner of the 2007 Poetry Now award and the 2006 T.S. Eliot Prize for Poetry.

Human Chain

Author: Seamus Heaney
Editor: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1466855673
Size: 17,37 MB
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A Boston Globe Best Poetry Book of 2011 Winner of the 2011 Griffin Poetry Prize Winner of the 2011 Poetry Now Award Seamus Heaney's new collection elicits continuities and solidarities, between husband and wife, child and parent, then and now, inside an intently remembered present—the stepping stones of the day, the weight and heft of what is passed from hand to hand, lifted and lowered. Human Chain also broaches larger questions of transmission, of lifelines to the inherited past. There are newly minted versions of anonymous early Irish lyrics, poems that stand at the crossroads of oral and written, and other "hermit songs" that weigh equally in their balance the craft of scribe and the poet's early calling as scholar. A remarkable sequence entitled "Route 101" plots the descent into the underworld in the Aeneid against single moments in the arc of a life, from a 1950s childhood to the birth of a first grandchild. Other poems display a Virgilian pietas for the dead—friends, neighbors, family—that is yet wholly and movingly vernacular. Human Chain also includes a poetic "herbal" adapted from the Breton poet Guillevic—lyrics as delicate as ferns, which puzzle briefly over the world of things and landscapes that exclude human speech, while affirming the interconnectedness of phenomena, as of a self-sufficiency in which we too are included.

Seamus Heaney And The Emblems Of Hope

Author: Karen Marguerite Moloney
Editor: University of Missouri Press
ISBN: 0826265898
Size: 12,75 MB
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"Explores Seamus Heaney's adaptation of the Celtic ritual known as the Feis of Tara, demonstrates the sovereignty motif's continued relevance in works by Irish poets Thomas Kinsella, John Montague, Eavan Boland, and Nuala Ni Dhomhnaill, and refutes criticism that charges sexism and overemphasizes sacrifice in Heaney's poetry"--Provided by publisher.

Rome S Wreck

Author: Trevor Joyce
Editor:
ISBN: 9780990546108
Size: 10,95 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In Rome's Wreck, Irish poet Trevor Joyce "translates" Edmund Spenser's earlier English translation of Joachim du Bellay's Les Antiquités de Rome [1558] as The Ruines of Rome [1591]. Rather than an interlingual translation, Joyce's is a translation from one English into another, subject to a singular constraint: that it be completely done over into monosyllables. The result is a colloquial yet uncanny undoing of Spenser's work and a postmodern meditation on fame and mortal decay.

Talking With Poets

Author: Harry Thomas
Editor: Other Press, LLC
ISBN: 1590514394
Size: 14,39 MB
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The five interviews in this book were conducted by students in “The Art of Poetry,” a course that Harry Thomas taught for several years. The students’ depth of knowledge and keenness of insight into the poets’ work is an affirmation of American education. The poets respond to the students with a frankness and feeling of fraternity that mounts at times to a sort of communion. The poets take up a great range of matters in the interviews the nature of artistic creation, the varieties and difficulties of poetic translation, poetry and politics, religion, popular culture, the contemporary readership for poetry, and the experience of living as a poet in a country not your own. They speak with familiarity and enthusiasm of a number of writers, including Eliot, Joyce, Rilke, Brodsky, Pound, Ovid, Dante, Ralegh, Wordsworth, Keats, Mandelstam, and Wilde. One of the delights of reading these interviews is to observe the poets responding to the same matter for instance, Seamus Heaney speaking of Robert Pinsky’s translation of Czeslaw Milosz’s great poem, “The World,” and Robert Pinsky speaking at length of Seamus Heaney’s essay, in The Government of the Tongue, on Pinsky’s translation. This is an intimate look into the minds of five of our most celebrated contemporary poets and an invigorating meditation on some of our most human concerns.

Selected Poems 1966 1987

Author: Seamus Heaney
Editor: Farrar, Straus and Giroux
ISBN: 1466855789
Size: 17,23 MB
Format: PDF
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"Between my fingers and my thumb The squat pen rests. I'll dig with it." Selected Poems 1966-1987 assembles the groundbreaking work of the first half of Seamus Heaney's extraordinary career. This edition, arranged by the author himself, includes the seminal early poetry that struck readers with the force of revelation and heralded the arrival of an heir to Gerard Manley Hopkins, W. B. Yeats, and Robert Frost. Helen Vendler called Heaney "a poet of the in-between," and the work collected here dwells in the borderlands dividing the ancient and the contemporary, the mythic and the quotidian. Gathering poetry from his first seven collections, Selected Poems 1966-1987 presents the young man from County Derry, Northern Ireland, who "emerged from a hidden, a buried life" in Death of a Naturalist (1966), with his cherished poems "Digging" and "Mid-term Break"; the poet of conscience "as bleak as he is bright" in "Whatever You Say Say Nothing" and "Singing School"; and the astonishingly gifted, mature craftsman behind Field Work (1979) and Station Island (1984)-an artist uncannily attuned to the "music of what happens," restlessly searching "for images and symbols adequate to our predicament." This volume, together with its companion Selected Poems 1988-2013, allows us to revisit the essential work of one of the great writers of our age through his own compilation.