Teaching As A Design Science

Author: Diana Laurillard
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1136448209
Size: 14,28 MB
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Teaching is changing. It is no longer simply about passing on knowledge to the next generation. Teachers in the twenty-first century, in all educational sectors, have to cope with an ever-changing cultural and technological environment. Teaching is now a design science. Like other design professionals – architects, engineers, programmers – teachers have to work out creative and evidence-based ways of improving what they do. Yet teaching is not treated as a design profession. Every day, teachers design and test new ways of teaching, using learning technology to help their students. Sadly, their discoveries often remain local. By representing and communicating their best ideas as structured pedagogical patterns, teachers could develop this vital professional knowledge collectively. Teacher professional development has not embedded in the teacher’s everyday role the idea that they could discover something worth communicating to other teachers, or build on each others’ ideas. Could the culture change? From this unique perspective on the nature of teaching, Diana Laurillard argues that a twenty-first century education system needs teachers who work collaboratively to design effective and innovative teaching.

Teaching As A Design Science

Author: Diana Laurillard
Editor:
ISBN: 9780203125083
Size: 12,59 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Teaching is changing. It is no longer simply about passing on knowledge to the next generation. Teachers in the twenty-first century, in all educational sectors, have to cope with an ever-changing cultural and technological environment. Teaching is now a design science. Like other design professionalsaOCo architects, engineers, programmers OCo teachers have to work out creative and evidence-based ways of improving what they do. Yet teaching is not treated as a design profession. Every day, teachers design and test new ways of teaching, using learning technology to help their students. Sadly, their discoveries often remain local. By representing and communicating their best ideas as structured pedagogical patterns, teachers could develop this vital professional knowledge collectively. Teacher professional development has not embedded in the teacherOCOs everyday role the idea that they could discover something worth communicating to other teachers, or build on each othersOCO ideas. Could the culture change? From this unique perspective on the nature of teaching, Diana Laurillard argues that a twenty-first century education system needs teachers who work collaboratively to design effective and innovative teaching."

The Teaching Of Design And Innovation

Author: Gabriel J. Costello
Editor: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3030413802
Size: 16,37 MB
Format: PDF
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This book is about design and innovation – what it is and how to teach it. The blending of design and innovation is having an increasing impact not only on the world of products and services but on a wide variety of disciplines such as information and communications technology (ICT), business, education and medicine. However, there is a lack of books on teaching the subject despite the significant growth of interest in both academia and the workplace. This book addresses this gap by outlining foundational principles for the teaching of design and innovation and by offering a practical process for implementing the pedagogy in academic institutions and outside academia in the context of continuing professional development (CPD). It describes two undergraduate case-studies that aimed to instill design and innovation competences in students of both engineering and business disciplines. The cases involved student teams working with incubation centre start-ups and multi-national subsidiaries. One of the aims of this book is to provide a resource for continuing professional development (CPD). Consequently, a third practitioner-based case study is presented as an example of research-informed teaching. In addition, the book proposes the concept of Simulation-Action Learning (SAL) as an enhancement of Project-Based Learning (PBL).

Design Alchemy

Author: Roderick Sims
Editor: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 331902423X
Size: 16,21 MB
Format: PDF
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The promise of online learning--flexible, learner-centered, responsive--was forward-looking and poised to revolutionize education. But too often online learning courses have little room for student engagement and their design does not reflect the potential for interactive and collaborative learning. Design Alchemy counters this trend by synthesizing the art and science of educational design to model a whole that transcends the sum of its parts. Challenging yet accessible, it clearly sets out steps for harnessing innovative strategies and designer creativity to provide educational platforms that reduce learner boredom and instructor burnout, and encourage deeper interaction with subject matter. Activities, assessment methods, and sample course materials are designed toward improving quality, embracing diversity, and adapting positively to change. And the book's palette of resources enables readers to effectively apply the principles in their own practice: The evolution of Design Alchemy in the context of online learning. Alignment with core theories and practice models. The framework: elements of pedagogy and components of practice. Case studies showing Design Alchemy in real-world learning. Tools, templates, and a sample syllabus. The Design Alchemy Manifesto, summarizing key ideas. Researchers and practitioners in technology and education will look to Design Alchemy as a transformative work to help make the most of student potential, learning opportunities, and their own professional growth.

Reflective Teaching In Higher Education

Author: Paul Ashwin
Editor: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1441147233
Size: 15,83 MB
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Reflective Teaching in Higher Education is the definitive textbook for reflective teachers in higher education. Informed by the latest research in this area, the book offers extensive support for those at the start of an academic career and career-long professionalism for those teaching in higher education. Written by an international collaborative author team of higher education experts led by Paul Ashwin, Reflective Teaching in Higher Education offers two levels of support: - practical guidance for day-to-day teaching, covering key issues such as strategies for improving learning, teaching and assessment, curriculum design, relationships, communication, and inclusion; and - evidence-informed 'principles' to aid understanding of how theories can effectively inform teaching practices, offering ways to develop a deeper understanding of teaching and learning in higher education. Case studies, activities, research briefings and annotated key readings are provided throughout. The author team: Paul Ashwin (Lancaster University, UK) | David Boud (University of Technology, Sydney, Australia) | Kelly Coate (King's Learning Institute, King's College London, UK) | Fiona Hallett (Edge Hill University, UK) | Elaine Keane (National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland) | Kerri-Lee Krause (Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia) | Brenda Leibowitz (University of Johannesburg, South Africa) | Iain MacLaren (National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland) | Jan McArthur (Lancaster University, UK) | Velda McCune (University of Edinburgh, UK) | Michelle Tooher National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland) This book forms part of the Reflective Teaching series, edited by Andrew Pollard and Amy Pollard, offering support for reflective practice in early, primary, secondary, further, vocational, university and adult sectors of education. Reflective Teaching in Higher Education and its website, www.reflectiveteaching.co.uk, promote the expertise of teaching within higher education.

Mastering Mobile Learning

Author: Chad Udell
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118885023
Size: 19,79 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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Discover the strategies, tools, and technologies necessary for developing successful mobile learning programs In the modern, rapidly-expanding mobile learning environment, only clear guidelines and state-of-the-art technologies will stand up to the challenges that lie ahead. With a smart focus that combines a proven process with all-important strategies and practical applications, Mastering Mobile Learning stands as the most modern, comprehensive resource on the subject. It also features unique technical content previously unavailable among the literature of the mobile learning field. This book will help you turn concept into reality. This book will show you best practices for obtaining and providing educational, training, and professional development content on devices like smartphones, tablets and other mobile devices. Trainers, educators, designers, instructional technologists, workplace learning professionals, and HR professionals will learn how mobile learning differs from other forms of e-learning, and will be introduced to the challenges and—more importantly—the advantages of mobile learning strategies and technologies for 21st century business environments. The book provides: An overview of mobile learning, including evolving definitions and reasons for executives to embrace this approach A discussion of the business drivers of mobile learning, advice for creating a mobile learning content strategy, and easy ways to inexpensively launch mobile learning Valuable tips on how to use unique affordances of mobile devices to better serve your learners while they are on the go Information on the ROI of mobile learning, using mobile devices as research tools, and why training in mobile development is critical An overview of the technical aspects of the design and development of mobile learning Written by experts in this burgeoning field, Mastering Mobile Learning provides a roadmap for creating the most effective learning content, strategies, and applications possible.

Handbook Of Design Research Methods In Education

Author: Anthony E. Kelly
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317639642
Size: 18,90 MB
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This Handbook presents the latest thinking and current examples of design research in education. Design-based research involves introducing innovations into real-world practices (as opposed to constrained laboratory contexts) and examining the impact of those designs on the learning process. Designed prototype applications (e.g., instructional methods, software or materials) and the research findings are then cycled back into the next iteration of the design innovation in order to build evidence of the particular theories being researched, and to positively impact practice and the diffusion of the innovation. The Handbook of Design Research Methods in Education-- the defining book for the field -- fills a need in how to conduct design research by those doing so right now. The chapters represent a broad array of interpretations and examples of how today’s design researchers conceptualize this emergent methodology across areas as diverse as educational leadership, diffusion of innovations, complexity theory, and curriculum research. This volume is designed as a guide for doctoral students, early career researchers and cross-over researchers from fields outside of education interested in supporting innovation in educational settings through conducting design research.

Mathematics Education As A Research Domain A Search For Identity

Author: Anna Sierpinska
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 9401151946
Size: 15,43 MB
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No one disputes how important it is, in today's world, to prepare students to un derstand mathematics as well as to use and communicate mathematics in their future lives. That task is very difficult, however. Refocusing curricula on funda mental concepts, producing new teaching materials, and designing teaching units based on 'mathematicians' common sense' (or on logic) have not resulted in a better understanding of mathematics by more students. The failure of such efforts has raised questions suggesting that what was missing at the outset of these proposals, designs, and productions was a more profound knowledge of the phenomena of learning and teaching mathematics in socially established and culturally, politically, and economically justified institutions - namely, schools. Such knowledge cannot be built by mere juxtaposition of theories in disci plines such as psychology, sociology, and mathematics. Psychological theories focus on the individual learner. Theories of sociology of education look at the general laws of curriculum development, the specifics of pedagogic discourse as opposed to scientific discourse in general, the different possible pedagogic rela tions between the teacher and the taught, and other general problems in the inter face between education and society. Mathematics, aside from its theoretical contents, can be looked at from historical and epistemological points of view, clarifying the genetic development of its concepts, methods, and theories. This view can shed some light on the meaning of mathematical concepts and on the difficulties students have in teaching approaches that disregard the genetic development of these concepts.