Techno Vernacular Creativity And Innovation

Author: Nettrice R. Gaskins
Editor: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262542668
File Size: 55,25 MB
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A novel approach to STEAM learning that engages students from historically marginalized communities in culturally relevant and inclusive maker education. The growing maker movement in education has become an integral part of both STEM and STEAM learning, tapping into the natural DIY inclinations of creative people as well as the educational power of inventing or making things. And yet African American, Latino/a American, and Indigenous people are underrepresented in maker culture and education. In this book, Nettrice Gaskins proposes a novel approach to STEAM learning that engages students from historically marginalized communities in culturally relevant and inclusive maker education. Techno-vernacular creativity (TVC) connects technical literacy, equity, and culture, encompassing creative innovations produced by ethnic groups that are often overlooked. TVC uses three main modes of activity: reappropriation, remixing, and improvisation. Gaskins looks at each of the three modes in turn, guiding readers from research into practice. Drawing on real-world examples, she shows how TVC creates dynamic learning environments where underrepresented ethnic students feel that they belong. Students who remix computationally, for instance, have larger toolkits of computational skills with which to connect cultural practices to STEAM subjects; reappropriation offers a way to navigate cultural repertoires; improvisation is firmly rooted in cultural and creative practices. Finally, Gaskins explores an equity-oriented approach that makes a distinction between conventional or dominant pedagogical approaches and culturally relevant or responsive making methods and practices. She describes TVC habits of mind and suggests methods of instructions and projects.
Techno-Vernacular Creativity and Innovation
Language: en
Pages: 206
Authors: Nettrice R. Gaskins
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-08-10 - Publisher: MIT Press

A novel approach to STEAM learning that engages students from historically marginalized communities in culturally relevant and inclusive maker education. The growing maker movement in education has become an integral part of both STEM and STEAM learning, tapping into the natural DIY inclinations of creative people as well as the
Techno-vernacular Creativity and Innovation
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Nettrice R. Gaskins, Leah Buechley, Ruha Benjamin
Categories: Culturally relevant pedagogy
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020 - Publisher:

"Gaskins draws on research and theory from culturally responsive pedagogy to reimagine the maker movement as more inclusive and diverse"--
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Language: en
Pages: 256
Authors: Popple, Simon, Prescott, Andrew
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-07-01 - Publisher: Policy Press

This innovative handbook examines the changing relationship between communities, citizens and the notion of the archive. Archives have traditionally been understood as repositories of knowledge and experience, remote from the ordinary people who fund and populate them, however digital resources have led to a growing plurality of archives and the
Computational Thinking in Education
Language: en
Pages: 236
Authors: Aman Yadav, Ulf Dalvad Berthelsen
Categories: Education
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-11-23 - Publisher: Routledge

Computational Thinking in Education explores the relevance of computational thinking in primary and secondary education. As today’s school-aged students prepare to live and work in a thoroughly digitized world, computer science is providing a wealth of new learning concepts and opportunities across domains. This book offers a comprehensive overview of
Afrofuturism 2.0
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Reynaldo Anderson, Charles E. Jones
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-12-16 - Publisher: Lexington Books

The ideas and practices related to afrofuturism have existed for most of the 20th century, especially in the north American African diaspora community. After Mark Dery coined the word "afrofuturism" in 1993, Alondra Nelson as a member of an online forum, along with other participants, began to explore the initial