The Archaeology Of Ancient Arizona

Author: J. Jefferson Reid
Editor: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816513802
Size: 16,87 MB
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Carved from cliffs and canyons, buried in desert rock and sand are pieces of the ancient past that beckon thousands of visitors every year to the American Southwest. Whether Montezuma Castle or a chunk of pottery, these traces of prehistory also bring archaeologists from all over the world, and their work gives us fresh insight and information on an almost day-to-day basis. Who hasn't dreamed of boarding a time machine for a trip into the past? This book invites us to step into a Hohokam village with its sounds of barking dogs, children's laughter, and the ever-present grinding of mano on metate to produce the daily bread. Here, too, readers will marvel at the skills of Clovis elephant hunters and touch the lives of other ancestral people known as Mogollon, Anasazi, Sinagua, and Salado. Descriptions of long-ago people are balanced with tales about the archaeologists who have devoted their lives to learning more about "those who came before." Trekking through the desert with the famed Emil Haury, readers will stumble upon Ventana Cave, his "answer to a prayer." With amateur archaeologist Richard Wetherill, they will sense the peril of crossing the flooded San Juan River on the way to Chaco Canyon. Others profiled in the book are A. V. Kidder, Andrew Ellicott Douglass, Julian Hayden, Harold S. Gladwin, and many more names synonymous with the continuing saga of southwestern archaeology. This book is an open invitation to general readers to join in solving the great archaeological puzzles of this part of the world. Moreover, it is the only up-to-date summary of a field advancing so rapidly that much of the material is new even to professional archaeologists. Lively and fast paced, the book will appeal to anyone who finds magic in a broken bowl or pueblo wall touched by human hands hundreds of years ago. For all readers, these pages offer a sense of adventure, that "you are there" stir of excitement that comes only with making new discoveries about the distant past.

The Archaeology Of Environmental Change

Author: Christopher T. Fisher
Editor: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816526765
Size: 10,16 MB
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Water management, soil conservation, sustainable animal husbandry . . . because such socio-environmental challenges have been faced throughout history, lessons from the past can often inform modern policy. In this book, case studies from a wide range of times and places reveal how archaeology can contribute to a better understanding of humans' relation to the environment. The Archaeology of Environmental Change shows that the challenges facing humanity today, in terms of causing and reacting to environmental change, can be better approached through an attempt to understand how societies in the past dealt with similar circumstances. The contributors draw on archaeological research in multiple regionsÑNorth America, Mesoamerica, Europe, the Near East, and AfricaÑfrom time periods spanning the Holocene, and from environments ranging from tropical forest to desert. Ê Through such examples as environmental degradation in Transjordan, wildlife management in East Africa, and soil conservation among the ancient Maya, they demonstrate the negative effects humans have had on their environments and how societies in the past dealt with these same problems. All call into question and ultimately refute popular notions of a simple cause-and-effect relationship between people and their environment, and reject the notion of people as either hapless victims of unstoppable forces or inevitable destroyers of natural harmony. Ê These contributions show that by examining long-term trajectories of socio-natural relationships we can better define concepts such as sustainability, land degradation, and conservationÑand that gaining a more accurate and complete understanding of these connections is essential for evaluating current theories and models of environmental degradation and conservation. Their insights demonstrate that to understand the present environment and to manage landscapes for the future, we must consider the historical record of the total sweep of anthropogenic environmental change. Ê

The Archaeology Of Garden And Field

Author: Naomi F. Miller
Editor: University of Pennsylvania Press
ISBN: 9780812216417
Size: 11,27 MB
Format: PDF
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Cultivation and land use practices the world over reflect many aspects of people's relationship to each other and to the natural world. The Archaeology of Garden and Field explores the cultivation of land from prehistoric times to the nineteenth century through excavation, experimentation, and the study of modern cultural traditions. The Archaeology of Garden and Field contains a wealth of information distilled from the combined experiences of the editors and contributors. Whether one's interest is the Old World or the New, prehistory or the present, this book provides a starting point for anyone who has ever wondered how archaeologists find and interpret the ephemeral traces of ancient cultivation.

The Ancient Maya Marketplace

Author: Eleanor M. King
Editor: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 081650041X
Size: 18,63 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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"The Ancient Maya Marketplace, edited by Eleanor M. King, reviews the debate on prehispanic Maya markets. The volume's contributors challenge the model of a non-commercialized Maya economy and offer compelling new evidence for the existence and identification of ancient marketplaces among the Maya"--Provided by publisher.

The Columbia Guide To American Indians Of The Southwest

Author: Trudy Griffin-Pierce
Editor: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 0231520107
Size: 20,44 MB
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A major work on the history and culture of Southwest Indians, The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southwest tells a remarkable story of cultural continuity in the face of migration, displacement, violence, and loss. The Native peoples of the American Southwest are a unique group, for while the arrival of Europeans forced many Native Americans to leave their land behind, those who lived in the Southwest held their ground. Many still reside in their ancestral homes, and their oral histories, social practices, and material artifacts provide revelatory insight into the history of the region and the country as a whole. Trudy Griffin-Pierce incorporates her lifelong passion for the people of the Southwest, especially the Navajo, into an absorbing narrative of pre- and postcontact Native experiences. She finds that, even though the policies of the U.S. government were meant to promote assimilation, Native peoples formed their own response to outside pressures, choosing to adapt rather than submit to external change. Griffin-Pierce provides a chronology of instances that have shaped present-day conditions in the region, as well as an extensive glossary of significant people, places, and events. Setting a precedent for ethical scholarship, she describes different methods for researching the Southwest and cites sources for further archaeological and comparative study. Completing the volume is a selection of key primary documents, literary works, films, Internet resources, and contact information for each Native community, enabling a more thorough investigation into specific tribes and nations. The Columbia Guides to American Indian History and Culture also include: The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Great Plains Loretta Fowler The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Northeast Kathleen J. Bragdon The Columbia Guide to American Indians of the Southeast Theda Perdue and Michael D. Green

Ten Thousand Years Of Inequality

Author: Timothy A. Kohler
Editor: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816537747
Size: 11,54 MB
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"Field-defining research that will set the standard for understanding inequality in archaeological contexts"--Provided by publisher.

Beyond The Texts

Author: William G. Dever
Editor: SBL Press
ISBN: 0884142175
Size: 10,44 MB
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A handbook for biblical scholars and historians of the Ancient Near East William G. Dever offers a welcome perspective on ancient Israel and Judah that prioritizes the archaeological remains to render history as it was—not as the biblical writers argue it should have been. Drawing from the most recent archaeological data as interpreted from a nontheological point of view and supplementing that data with biblical material only when it converges with the archaeological record, Dever analyzes all the evidence at hand to provide a new history of ancient Israel and Judah that is accessible to all interested readers. Features A new approach to the history of ancient Israel Extensive bibliography More than eighty maps and illustrations

An Introduction To The Archaeology Of Ancient Egypt

Author: Kathryn A. Bard
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1118896114
Size: 18,11 MB
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This student-friendly introduction to the archaeology of ancientEgypt guides readers from the Paleolithic to the Greco-Romanperiods, and has now been updated to include recent discoveries andnew illustrations. • Superbly illustrated with photographs, maps, and siteplans, with additional illustrations in this new edition • Organized into 11 chapters, covering: thehistory of Egyptology and Egyptian archaeology; prehistoric andpharaonic chronology and the ancient Egyptian language; geography,resources, and environment; and seven chapters organizedchronologically and devoted to specific archaeological sites andevidence • Includes sections on salient topics such as theconstructing the Great Pyramid at Giza and the process ofmummification

Archaeology And Apprenticeship

Author: Willeke Wendrich
Editor: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 0816507678
Size: 10,31 MB
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Demonstrates how archaeology can benefit from the understanding of the social dimensions of knowledge transfer. Also examines apprenticeship in archaeology against a backdrop of sociological and cognitive psychology literature.

Thirty Years Into Yesterday

Author: J. Jefferson Reid
Editor: University of Arizona Press
ISBN: 9780816524020
Size: 14,86 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Describes the University of Arizona Archaeological Field School at Grasshopper Pueblo in northern Arizona, its excavation of a five-hundred-room Mogollon Pueblo occupied during the 1300s AD, and the intellectual debates the major project engendered.