The Oxford Handbook Of Later Medieval Archaeology In Britain

Author: Christopher Gerrard
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0191062111
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The Middle Ages are all around us in Britain. The Tower of London and the castles of Scotland and Wales are mainstays of cultural tourism and an inspiring cross-section of later medieval finds can now be seen on display in museums across England, Scotland, and Wales. Medieval institutions from Parliament and monarchy to universities are familiar to us and we come into contact with the later Middle Ages every day when we drive through a village or town, look up at the castle on the hill, visit a local church or wonder about the earthworks in the fields we see from the window of a train. The Oxford Handbook of Later Medieval Archaeology in Britain provides an overview of the archaeology of the later Middle Ages in Britain between AD 1066 and 1550. 61 entries, divided into 10 thematic sections, cover topics ranging from later medieval objects, human remains, archaeological science, standing buildings, and sites such as castles and monasteries, to the well-preserved relict landscapes which still survive. This is a rich and exciting period of the past and most of what we have learnt about the material culture of our medieval past has been discovered in the past two generations. This volume provides comprehensive coverage of the latest research and describes the major projects and concepts that are changing our understanding of our medieval heritage.

Magic In The Cloister

Author: Sophie Page
Editor: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271069317
File Size: 57,41 MB
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During the late thirteenth and early fourteenth centuries a group of monks with occult interests donated what became a remarkable collection of more than thirty magic texts to the library of the Benedictine abbey of St. Augustine's in Canterbury. The monks collected texts that provided positive justifications for the practice of magic and books in which works of magic were copied side by side with works of more licit genres. In Magic in the Cloister, Sophie Page uses this collection to explore the gradual shift toward more positive attitudes to magical texts and ideas in medieval Europe. She examines what attracted monks to magic texts, works, and how they combined magic with their intellectual interests and monastic life. By showing how it was possible for religious insiders to integrate magical studies with their orthodox worldview, Magic in the Cloister contributes to a broader understanding of the role of magical texts and ideas and their acceptance in the late Middle Ages.

Registrum Simons De Sudbiria Diocesis Londoniensis A D 1362 1375

Author: Catholic Church. Diocese of London. Bishop (1362-1375 : Simon of Sudbury)
Editor:
ISBN:
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Surrey Archaeological Collections

Author:
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ISBN:
File Size: 43,55 MB
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Surrey Archaeological Collections

Author: Surrey Archaeological Society
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 36,11 MB
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Surrey Archaeological Collections Relating To The History And Antiquities Of The County

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Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 34,84 MB
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Journal

Author: Royal Institution of Cornwall
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 35,68 MB
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Journal Of The Royal Institution Of Cornwall

Author: Royal Institution of Cornwall
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 74,17 MB
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Includes the Reports of the Institution, which, prior to the establishment of the Journal, were issued separately.

Current Archaeology

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Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 45,98 MB
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Transactions Of The London And Middlesex Archaeological Society

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ISBN:
File Size: 34,91 MB
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Contains its Proceedings, Reports, List of members, etc.

Religion In Medieval London

Author: Bruno Barber
Editor: Museum of London Archaeology Svc
ISBN:
File Size: 60,79 MB
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This fully illustrated book summarises the evidence of belief from archaeological excavations in and around London.

The History Of Tanridge Priory Surrey

Author: Alfred Heales
Editor:
ISBN:
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St Marylebone Church And Burial Ground In The 18th To 19th Centuries

Author: Adrian Miles
Editor: Museum of London Archaeology Svc
ISBN:
File Size: 27,63 MB
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St Marylebone parish grew from humble beginnings on the city's margins to become, in the 18th and 19th centuries, one of the wealthiest in London, home to the elite and fashionable. The small parish church on Marylebone High Street, built in brick in 1742 on the site of the medieval church, was inadequate for such a congregation and was superceded in 1817 by today's far grander edifice on Marylebone Road. Archaeological investigations in 1992 showed that the graveyard - levelled in the 1930s for a playground for St Marylebone Church of England School for Girls - lay substantially undisturbed beneath the playground. In 2004 plans to build an underground sports hall allowed excavation of a sample of the burial ground and part of the church itself. Most of the 350+ burials recorded were from the graveyard; some were in family vaults and others inside the church crypt. The archaeological results and detailed osteological analysis of 301 individuals are combined with documentary research into the parish and its population, including the woman who preferred parrots to men, the artist who died of lockjaw and the Reverend headmaster and his 'most wicked and abandoned wife'. This volume is one of the largest and most comprehensive studies of a post-medieval London cemetery.

Burial At The Site Of The Parish Church Of St Benet Sherehog Before And After The Great Fire

Author: Adrian Miles
Editor: Museum of London Archaeology Svc
ISBN:
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Archaeological work at 1 Poultry includes analysis of 280 burials associated with the medieval church of St Benet Sherehog and a post-Great Fire burial ground on the same location. Post-medieval coffins and coffin furniture indicate that the burial population is primarily late, with a fifth dated to before the Great Fire, although none were associated with the primary phase of the church. The parish of St Benet Sherehog pre- and post-Fire is considered in terms of the documented population, occupations and wealth, and health and mortality. This is followed by evidence for the medieval church of St Benet and the religious life of the parish. 'Death and commemoration' looks at historical and archaeological evidence for funerals and burial practices. A detailed osteological account of the 17th- to 19th-century burial sample includes comparison with contemporary London cemetery populations.

Great Houses Moats And Mills On The South Bank Of The Thames

Author: Simon Blatherwick
Editor: Museum of London Archaeology Svc
ISBN:
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Regeneration in the 1980s-90s on the south bank of the Thames resulted in archaeological and historical investigations at Platform Wharf, Rotherhithe, and next to London Bridge, in Southwark. The development of both sites from the 14th century is of major interest. The Rotherhithe property was acquired c 1349 by Edward III and the existing house rebuilt by him in 1353-61 with two courts, including a riverside range of apartments. Royal interest ceased after Edward's reign, and the house passed to Bermondsey Priory in 1399. The fragmentation of the site into smaller properties, including ones with industrial uses, is charted. The Southwark site contained three notable residences during the medieval period and tidal mills on the waterfront. The 14th-century moated house of the Dunley family and a pleasure-house built by Edward II, the Rosary, were both acquired by Sir John Fastolf for his own grand London residence in the 1440s. In the later 16th century there was massive immigration into this part of Southwark and by the mid 17th century the former moats and gardens were built over with small properties and alleys. The moat infills produced exceptionally rich assemblages of domestic artefacts and ceramics, the waterside location preserved a wide variety of plants, timber structures and woodworking evidence.

The Royal Navy Victualling Yard East Smithfield London

Author: Ian Grainger
Editor: Museum of London Archaeology Svc
ISBN:
File Size: 36,23 MB
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The Royal Navy victualling yard was excavated in 1983-8 as part of the Royal Mint site. Founded in 1560, on the site of a Black Death cemetery and the suppressed Cistercian abbey of St Mary Graces, it was the first large-scale naval food supply base in Britain and remained the principal one until the 18th century. The yard closed in 1785, having proved inadequate for the needs of he expanding Georgian navy. A substantial part of the ground plan of the yard was recorded, including salthouses and pickling sheds, slaughterhouses and yards, backeries, coopers' workshops, storehouses, and the offices and dwellings of yard personnel. The evidence suggests that food processing was increasing industrialised from the late 17th century onwards. The excavated remains are compared to the substantial documentary evidence available, particularly two detailed plans of 1635 and 1776. The success and ultimate failure of the yard as a supply depot is assessed, including the extent to which former abbey buildings were reused by the navy and the deleterious effect this had. The work reported on here represents the most extensive excavation and post-excavation analysis of an early post-medieval naval victualling establishment in this country

London S Roman Amphitheatre

Author: Nick Bateman
Editor: Museum of London Archaeology Svc
ISBN:
File Size: 44,27 MB
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The discovery of one of Roman Londons most significant buildings - its amphitheatre - underneath the medieval Guildhall resulted from major archaeological excavations which took place between 1985 and 1999 as part of the City of London Corporations ambitious programme of redevelopment at the Guildhall. The history of the Guildhall and its precinct from the 12th to the 20th centuries is the subject of a companion volume. This book describes the construction, development and disuse of the amphitheatre, from the 1st to 4th centuries AD. Constructed on relatively low ground in the north-west part of Londinium, the first amphitheatre was built in c AD 74 of timber. Evidence was recovered for the eastern entrance, arena palisade, bank for seating and associated drains. The amphitheatre was rebuilt shortly after AD 120, with masonry foundations and walls, associated with new timber stands. The evidence allows conjectural reconstruction and comparison with other British amphitheatres. Abandoned by the mid 4th century, the amphitheatre was largely demolished and sealed by dark earth. The arena may have survived as an oval depression until the area was reoccupied in the 11th century. Significant finds assemblages include an early 2nd-century dump of glass cullet, lead curses from the arena surface and samian pottery with gladiatorial motifs. The amphitheatres remains are preserved and displayed in the basement of the new Guildhall Art Gallery.

The Black Death Cemetery East Smithfield London

Author: Ian Grainger
Editor: Museum of London Archaeology Svc
ISBN:
File Size: 35,19 MB
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Royal Mint site excavation report published as 3 separate volumes, the other 2 being: The abbey of St. Mary Graces, East Smithfield, London; The Royal Navy victualling yard, East Smithfield, London.

Early And Middle Saxon Rural Settlement In The London Region

Author: Robert Cowie
Editor: Museum of London Archaeology Svc
ISBN:
File Size: 46,85 MB
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Until now the evidence for London's Early and Middle Saxon rural settlement and economy has received scant attention. This monograph provides a long-awaited overview of the subject, drawing on the results of six decades of archaeological fieldwork since the war, in addition to historical and place-name evidence. Some of the material has been published before and will be familiar to the reader, but much of it has only been available as site archives or unpublished reports, and at best briefly summarised as notes in excavation round-ups. This synthesis therefore forms an indispensible guide to researchers. The first part focuses on twenty-six sites and six fish traps across the region, followed by thematic sections on a range of topics, and then a final section on the pottery finds.