The Biology Of Nectaries

Author: Barbara Bentley
Editor: Columbia University Press
ISBN: 9780231044462
File Size: 55,95 MB
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The Biology of Nectaries
Language: en
Pages: 259
Authors: Barbara Bentley, Thomas Elias, Thomas S. Elias
Categories: Nature
Type: BOOK - Published: 1983 - Publisher: Columbia University Press

Books about The Biology of Nectaries
New Perspectives on the Biology of Nectaries and Nectars
Language: en
Pages: 262
Authors: Clay Carter, Robert W. Thornburg, Massimo Nepi
Categories: Nature
Type: BOOK - Published: 2019-08-27 - Publisher: Frontiers Media SA

The number of currently known, described and accepted plant species is ca 374,000, of which approximately 295,00 (79%) are angiosperms. Almost 90% of this huge number of flowering plants is pollinated by animals (mostly insects) via nectar-mediated interactions. Notably, three-fourths of the leading global crop plants produce nectar and are
Nectaries and Nectar
Language: en
Pages: 396
Authors: Susan W. Nicolson, Massimo Nepi, Ettore Pacini
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-04-18 - Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

Nectar is the most important reward offered by plants to pollinating animals. This book is a modern and interdisciplinary text on nectar and nectaries, prompted by the expansion of knowledge in ecological and molecular fields, and the strong recent interest in pollination biology. The topics covered vary widely: they include
The Biology Of Nectaries
Language: en
Pages: 259
Authors: B. Bentley And E. Thomas
Categories: Science
Type: BOOK - Published: - Publisher:

Books about The Biology Of Nectaries
The Biology of Mutualism
Language: en
Pages: 388
Authors: Douglas H. Boucher
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 1988 - Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

The view of nature as `red in tooth and claw', as a jungle in which competition and predation are the predominant themes, has long been important in both the scientific and popular literature. However, in the past decade another view has become widespread among ecologists: the idea that mutualisms--mutually beneficial