The End Of Memory

Author: Miroslav Volf
Editor: Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing
ISBN: 0802829899
Size: 10,24 MB
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Can one forget atrocities? Should one forgive abusers? Ought we not hope for the final reconciliation of all the wronged and all wrongdoers alike, even if it means spending eternity with perpetrators of evil? We live in an age when it is generally accepted that past wrongs -- genocides, terrorist attacks, bald personal injustices -- should be constantly remembered. But Miroslav Volf here proposes the radical idea that "letting go" of such memories -- after a certain point and under certain conditions -- may actually be the appropriate course of action. While agreeing with the claim that to remember a wrongdoing is to struggle against it, Volf notes that there are too many ways to remember wrongly, perpetuating the evil committed rather than guarding against it. In this way, the just sword of memory often severs the very good it seeks to defend. He argues that remembering rightly has implications not only for the individual but also for the wrongdoer and for the larger community. Volfs personal stories of persecution offer a compelling backdrop for his search for theological resources to make memories a wellspring of healing rather than a source of deepening pain and animosity. Controversial, thoughtful, and incisively reasoned, "The End of Memory" begins a conversation hard to ignore.

The End Of Memory

Author: Jay Ingram
Editor: Random House
ISBN: 1473529654
Size: 11,23 MB
Format: PDF
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It has been called ‘the plague of the 21st century’ for its dramatic increase in numbers and the challenge it poses to health care. There are no effective treatments, merely a few drugs that promise only short-lived results. For centuries, those afflicted by Alzheimer's disease have been robbed of their memories and ability to think clearly; while families have watched their loved ones disappear day by day. In The End of Memory, award-winning author Jay Ingram charts the history of the disease, explaining the fascinating science behind it, recounting the efforts to understand and combat it, and introduces us to the passionate researchers who are working to find a cure. This is an important book for the millions of people around the world who are affected by Alzheimer’s, as well as those who are intrigued by both the ageing process and the brain, and wish to understand them better.

Promise Of Memory The

Author: Matthias Fritsch
Editor: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791482780
Size: 14,52 MB
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Argues for a closer connection between memories of injustice and promises of justice as a means to overcome violence.

The End Of Memory

Author: Jay Ingram
Editor: HarperCollins
ISBN: 144344040X
Size: 13,30 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Canada’s bestselling science writer illuminates the mysteries of Alzheimer’s disease, one of the most puzzling and debilitating conditions of the modern era It is a wicked illness that robs its victims of their memories, their ability to think clearly and, ultimately, their lives. For centuries, those afflicted by Alzheimer’s disease have been forced to suffer its devastating effects while family members sit by, watching their loved ones disappear a little more each day, until the person they used to know is gone forever. The disease was first described by pioneering German neurologist Alois Alzheimer in 1906. One hundred years and a great deal of scientific effort later, much more is known about Alzheimer’s, but it still affects millions around the world, and there is no cure in sight. In The End of Memory, award-winning science writer Jay Ingram charts the history of the disease from before it was noted by Alois Alzheimer right through to the twenty-first century, as researchers continue to search for a cure. In the spirit of Siddhartha Mukherjee’s The Emperor of All Maladies, this book is for those who want to find out the truth about an affliction that courses through families and, in some cases, inexplicably affects people early in their lives.

The Cognitive Neuroscience Of Memory

Author: Amanda Parker
Editor: Psychology Press
ISBN: 113543073X
Size: 11,93 MB
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Recent advances in techniques available to memory researchers have led to a rapid expansion in the field of cognitive neuroscience of memory. This book provides accessible coverage of four key areas of recent advance, including research on functional imaging, electrophysiological and lesion studies, and developments from the computational modelling approach. The first section reviews functional imaging studies in humans, with particular emphasis on how imaging methods have clarified the cortical areas involved in memory formation and retrieval. The second section describes electrophysiological and lesion research in monkeys, where lesion and disconnection studies are rapidly adding to our knowledge of both information processing and modulatory aspects of memory formation. In the third section, electrophysiological and lesion studies in rats are reviewed allowing for a detailed study of the role of novelty and exploration in memory formation. The final section reviews current research in computational modelling which has allowed the development of new theoretical and experimental approaches to the study of memory encoding and retrieval. This volume draws together the current developments in each field, allowing the synthesis of ideas and providing converging evidence from a range of sources. It will be a useful resource for both advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students of psychology, as well as researchers in the field and anyone with an interest in cognitive neuroscience.

Dynamics Of Memory And Identity In Contemporary Europe

Author: Eric Langenbacher
Editor: Berghahn Books
ISBN: 0857455818
Size: 11,87 MB
Format: PDF
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The collapse of the Iron Curtain, the renationalization of eastern Europe, and the simultaneous eastward expansion of the European Union have all impacted the way the past is remembered in today's eastern Europe. At the same time, in recent years, the Europeanization of Holocaust memory and a growing sense of the need to stage a more "self-critical" memory has significantly changed the way in which western Europe commemorates and memorializes the past. The increasing dissatisfaction among scholars with the blanket, undifferentiated use of the term "collective memory" is evolving in new directions. This volume brings the tension into focus while addressing the state of memory theory itself.

The Gallery Of Memory

Author: Lina Bolzoni
Editor: University of Toronto Press
ISBN: 9780802043306
Size: 10,59 MB
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This book takes as its starting point a striking paradox: that the antique tradition of the art of memory -- created by an oral culture -- reached its moment of greatest diffusion during an age that saw the birth of the printed book.

Committing The Future To Memory

Author: Sarah Clift
Editor: Fordham Univ Press
ISBN: 0823254208
Size: 12,32 MB
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Whereas historical determinacy conceives the past as a complex and unstable network of causalities, this book asks how history can be related to a more radical future. To pose that question, it does not reject determinacy outright but rather seeks to explore how it works. In examining what it means to be "determined" by history, it also asks what kind of openings there might be in our encounters with history for interruptions, re-readings, and re-writings. Engaging texts spanning multiple genres and several centuries from John Locke to Maurice Blanchot, from Hegel to Benjamin Clift looks at experiences of time that exceed the historical narration of experiences said to have occurred in time. She focuses on the co-existence of multiple temporalities and opens up the quintessentially modern notion of historical succession to other possibilities. The alternatives she draws out include the mediations of language and narration, temporal leaps, oscillations and blockages, and the role played by contingency in representation. She argues that such alternatives compel us to reassess the ways we understand history and identity in a traumatic, or indeed in a post-traumatic, age.

The End Of Forgetting

Author: Kate Eichhorn
Editor: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 067497669X
Size: 11,81 MB
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Thanks to Facebook and Instagram, our younger selves have been captured and preserved online. But what happens, Kate Eichhorn asks, when we can’t leave our most embarrassing moments behind? Rather than a childhood cut short by a loss of innocence, the real crisis of the digital age may be the specter of a childhood that can never be forgotten.

The End Of Absence

Author: Michael John Harris
Editor: Penguin
ISBN: 0698150589
Size: 12,81 MB
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Soon enough, nobody will remember life before the Internet. What does this unavoidable fact mean? Those of us who have lived both with and without the crowded connectivity of online life have a rare opportunity. We can still recognize the difference between Before and After. We catch ourselves idly reaching for our phones at the bus stop. Or we notice how, midconversation, a fumbling friend dives into the perfect recall of Google. In this eloquent and thought-provoking book, Michael Harris argues that amid all the changes we're experiencing, the most interesting is the end of absence-the loss of lack. The daydreaming silences in our lives are filled; the burning solitudes are extinguished. There's no true "free time" when you carry a smartphone. Today's rarest commodity is the chance to be alone with your thoughts. Michael Harris is an award-winning journalist and a contributing editor at Western Living and Vancouvermagazines. He lives in Toronto, Canada.