The Everyday Dancer

Author: Deborah Bull
Editor: Faber & Faber
ISBN: 0571260942
Size: 18,45 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Everyday Dancer is a new and honest account of the business of dancing from a writer with first hand experience of the profession. Structured around the daily schedule, The Everyday Dancer goes behind the velvet curtain, the gilt and the glamour to uncover the everyday realities of a career in dance. Starting out with the obligatory daily 'class', the book progresses through the repetition of rehearsals, the excitement of creating new work, the nervous tension of the half hour call, the pressures of performance and the anti-climax of curtain down. Through this vivid portrait of a dancer's every day, Deborah Bull reveals the arc of a dancer's life: from the seven-year-old's very first ballet class, through training, to company life, up through the ranks from corps de ballet to principal and then, not thirty years after it all began, to retirement and the inevitable sense of loss that comes with saying goodbye to your childhood dreams.

Foundations Of The Everyday

Author: Eran Dorfman
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1783480513
Size: 16,49 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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A highly original and interdisciplinary study of the philosophy of the everyday.

The Representation Of Dance In Australian Novels

Author: Melinda Jewell
Editor: Peter Lang
ISBN: 9783034304177
Size: 15,52 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book is an analysis of the textual representation of dance in the Australian novel since the late 1890s. It examines how the act of dance is variously portrayed, how the word 'dance' is used metaphorically to convey actual or imagined movement, and how dance is written in a novelistic form. The author employs a wide range of theoretical approaches including postcolonial studies, theories concerned with class, gender, metaphor and dance and, in particular, Jung's concept of the shadow and theories concerned with vision. Through these variegated approaches, the study critiques the common view that dance is an expression of joie de vivre, liberation, transcendence, order and beauty. This text also probes issues concerned with the enactment of dance in Australia and abroad, and contributes to an understanding of how dance is 'translated' into literature. It makes an important contribution because the study of dance in Australian literature has been minimal, and this despite the reality that dance is prolific in Australian novels.

Ageing Gender Embodiment And Dance

Author: E. Schwaiger
Editor: Springer
ISBN: 0230359086
Size: 13,62 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book explores the nexus between gender, ageing and culture in dancers practicing a variety of genres. It challenges existing cultural norms which equate ageing with bodily decline and draws on an interdisciplinary theoretical framework to explore alternatives for developing a culturally valued mature subjectivity through the practice of dance.

Ballerina

Author: Deirdre Kelly
Editor: Greystone Books Ltd
ISBN: 1771640006
Size: 14,59 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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A Globe and Mail top 100 book of 2012 . . . spellbinding yet harrowing . . . —Publishers Weekly A controversial look at the brutal backstage existence of some of the world's most celebrated ballerinas. Throughout her history, the ballerina has been perceived as the embodiment of beauty and perfection. She is the feminine ideal—unblemished and ethereal, inspiration incarnate. But the reality is another story. Beginning with the earliest ballerinas, who often led double lives as concubines, Deirdre Kelly goes on to review the troubled lives of nineteenth-century ballerinas, who lived in poverty and worked under torturous and even life-threatening conditions. In the twentieth century, George Balanchine created a contradictory ballet culture that simultaneously idealized and oppressed ballerinas, and many of his dancers suffered from anorexia and bulimia or underwent cosmetic surgery to achieve the ideal ethereal form. At the beginning of the twenty-first century, ballerinas are still underpaid, vulnerable to arbitrary discrimination and dismissal, and expected to bear pain stoically—but much of this is beginning to change. As Kelly examines the lives of some of the world's best ballerinas—Anna Pavlova, Marie Camargo, Gelsey Kirkland, Evelyn Hart, and Misty Copeland, among others—she argues for a rethinking of the world's most graceful dance form—a rethinking that would position the ballerina at its heart, where she belongs. Also available in hardcover.

Ballet Class

Author: Melissa R. Klapper
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 0190908688
Size: 17,16 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Surveying the state of American ballet in a 1913 issue of McClure's Magazine, author Willa Cather reported that few girls expressed any interest in taking ballet class and that those who did were hard-pressed to find anything other than dingy studios and imperious teachers. One hundred years later, ballet is everywhere. There are ballet companies large and small across the United States; ballet is commonly featured in film, television, literature, and on social media; professional ballet dancers are spokespeople for all kinds of products; nail polish companies market colors like "Ballet Slippers" and "Prima Ballerina;" and, most importantly, millions of American children have taken ballet class. Beginning with the arrival of Russian dancers like Anna Pavlova, who first toured the United States on the eve of World War I, Ballet Class: An American History explores the growth of ballet from an ancillary part of nineteenth-century musical theater, opera, and vaudeville to the quintessential extracurricular activity it is today, pursued by countless children nationwide and an integral part of twentieth-century American childhood across borders of gender, class, race, and sexuality. A social history, Ballet Class takes a new approach to the very popular subject of ballet and helps ground an art form often perceived to be elite in the experiences of regular, everyday people who spent time in barre-lined studios across the United States. Drawing on a wide variety of materials, including children's books, memoirs by professional dancers and choreographers, pedagogy manuals, and dance periodicals, in addition to archival collections and oral histories, this pathbreaking study provides a deeply-researched national perspective on the history and significance of recreational ballet class in the United States and its influence on many facets of children's lives, including gender norms, consumerism, body image, children's literature, extracurricular activities, and popular culture.

Dancers Among Us

Author: Jordan Matter
Editor: Workman Publishing
ISBN: 0761193219
Size: 12,86 MB
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The mystery of the body in motion. The surprise of seeing what seems impossible. And the pure, joyful optimism of it all. Dancers Among Us presents one thrilling photograph after another of dancers leaping, spinning, lifting, kicking—but in the midst of daily life: on the beach, at a construction site, in a library, a restaurant, a park. With each image the reader feels buoyed up, eager to see the next bit of magic. Photographer Jordan Matter started his Dancers Among Us Project by asking a member of the Paul Taylor Dance Company to dance for him in a place where dance is unexpected. So, dressed in a commuter’s suit and tie, the dancer flew across a Times Square subway platform. And in that image Matter found what he’d been searching for: a way to express the feeling of being fully alive in the moment, unself-conscious, present. Organized around themes of work, play, love, exploration, dreaming, and more, Dancers Among Us celebrates life in a way that’s fresh, surprising, original, universal. There’s no photoshopping here, no trampolines, no gimmicks, no tricks. Just a photographer, his vision, and the serendipity of what happens when the shutter clicks.

Modernist Party

Author: Kate McLoughlin
Editor: Edinburgh University Press
ISBN: 0748681302
Size: 15,29 MB
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Have you ever been struck by the number of parties in Modernist literature? In The Modernist Party, internationally distinguished scholars explore the party both as a literary device and as a social setting in which the movement's creative values were dev

The Everyday Meditator

Author: Osho
Editor: Tuttle Pub
ISBN:
Size: 15,48 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The East has always enjoyed a monopoly on Meditational techniques. But not any more. With the publication of this book the East comes to the West in a lucidly adapted form, fully color illustrated and filled with a soft-seriousness of meditation techniques adapted over thousands of years. Meditation is still a relative stranger to the West in its true essence. We still tend to "think" of it as some sort of contemplation. But true meditation is "not-thinking" and not thinking is an unfamiliar state to the Westerner. Instead of meditating one hour a day, with this book we can learn to be in a constant state of meditation and sample results which are quite beyond expectations.

Men Who Dance

Author: Michael Gard
Editor: Peter Lang
ISBN: 9780820472669
Size: 14,45 MB
Format: PDF
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What kinds of men become theatrical dancers? Why do men do ballet? The worlds of Western theatrical dance, gender relations and sexuality intermingle and, overtime, produce different answers to these questions. Survey of the history of men in dance, as Nijinsky and Nureyev, and of subjects as masculinity and homosexuality.