The German Genius

Author: Peter Watson
Editor: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 085720324X
Size: 18,62 MB
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From the end of the Baroque age and the death of Bach in 1750 to the rise of Hitler in 1933, Germany was transformed from a poor relation among western nations into a dominant intellectual and cultural force more influential than France, Britain, Italy, Holland, and the United States. In the early decades of the 20th century, German artists, writers, philosophers, scientists, and engineers were leading their freshly-unified country to new and undreamed of heights, and by 1933, they had won more Nobel prizes than anyone else and more than the British and Americans combined. But this genius was cut down in its prime with the rise and subsequent fall of Adolf Hitler and his fascist Third Reich-a legacy of evil that has overshadowed the nation's contributions ever since. Yet how did the Germans achieve their pre-eminence beginning in the mid-18th century? In this fascinating cultural history, Peter Watson goes back through time to explore the origins of the German genius, how it flourished and shaped our lives, and, most importantly, to reveal how it continues to shape our world. As he convincingly demonstarates, while we may hold other European cultures in higher esteem, it was German thinking-from Bach to Nietzsche to Freud-that actually shaped modern America and Britain in ways that resonate today.

The German Polity

Author: Eric Langenbacher
Editor: Rowman & Littlefield
ISBN: 1442260580
Size: 13,39 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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This thoroughly revised and updated edition of The German Polity provides a comprehensive introduction to contemporary Germany, one of the world’s leading economic and political powers. Looking back, Eric Langenbacher and David P. Conradt trace the country’s transformation since the seminal turning points of 1945 after World War II and 1990 after reunification. Looking to the present, the authors explain and assess its major institutions, actors, and issues. Looking forward, they explore the looming economic, security, and demographic challenges the political system must address in the years to come.

Genius In France

Author: Ann Jefferson
Editor: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400852595
Size: 13,64 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
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This engaging book spans three centuries to provide the first full account of the long and diverse history of genius in France. Exploring a wide range of examples from literature, philosophy, and history, as well as medicine, psychology, and journalism, Ann Jefferson examines the ways in which the idea of genius has been ceaselessly reflected on and redefined through its uses in these different contexts. She traces its varying fortunes through the madness and imposture with which genius is often associated, and through the observations of those who determine its presence in others. Jefferson considers the modern beginnings of genius in eighteenth-century aesthetics and the works of philosophes such as Diderot. She then investigates the nineteenth-century notion of national and collective genius, the self-appointed role of Romantic poets as misunderstood geniuses, the recurrent obsession with failed genius in the realist novels of writers like Balzac and Zola, the contested category of female genius, and the medical literature that viewed genius as a form of pathology. She shows how twentieth-century views of genius narrowed through its association with IQ and child prodigies, and she discusses the different ways major theorists—including Sartre, Barthes, Derrida, and Kristeva—have repudiated and subsequently revived the concept. Rich in narrative detail, Genius in France brings a fresh approach to French intellectual and cultural history, and to the burgeoning field of genius studies.

The Seven Secrets Of Germany

Author: David B. Audretsch
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190258705
Size: 20,92 MB
Format: PDF
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German economic performance has astonished the world. At the turn of the century, Germany had been written off as the sick man of Europe. No more. Even as most of its European neighbors and OECD trading partners have struggled in the face of a turbulent global economy, the German economy has thrived. How does Germany do it? What is the secret? In The Seven Secrets of Germany, authors David Audretsch and Erik Lehmann answer these very questions. This book reveals, explains, and analyzes seven key aspects of Germany, its economy, and its society that have provided the nation with considerable buoyance in an era of global turbulence. These seven features range from the key and strategic role played by small firms to world leadership in its skilled and trained labor force, an ability to harness global opportunities through leveraging local resources, public infrastructure, the capacity to deal with change and confront challenges in a flexible manner, and the emergence of a remarkably positive identity and image. The Seven Secrets of Germany have insulated the country from long-term economic deterioration and enabled it to take advantage of the opportunities afforded from globalization rather than succumbing as a victim to globalization. This insights can be instructive to other countries and refute the defeatist view that globalization leads to an inevitable deterioration of the standard of living, quality of life, and degree of economic prosperity.

Victories Are Not Enough Limitations Of The German Way Of War

Author:
Editor: DIANE Publishing
ISBN: 1428916482
Size: 13,50 MB
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The Southern Magazine

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 14,12 MB
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The Nature And Genius Of The German Language Displayed

Author: Daniel Boileau
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 19,56 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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The German Example

Author: David Phillips
Editor: A&C Black
ISBN: 1441156305
Size: 14,88 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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Over the past two hundred years German education policy and practice has attracted interest in England. Policy makers have used the 'German example' both to encourage change and development and to warn against certain courses of action. This monograph provides the first major analysis of the rich material from government reports (including work by Matthew Arnold), the press, travel accounts, memoirs, scholarly publications and the archives to uncover the nature of the English fascination with education in Germany, from 1800 to the end of the twentieth century. David Phillips traces this story and uses recent work in theories of educational policy 'borrowing' to analyze the reception of the German experience and its impact on the development of English education policy.