The Hacker Ethos

Author: True Demon
Editor: Lulu Press, Inc
ISBN: 1329775007
File Size: 36,42 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 7854
Download

Herein, you will find a comprehensive, beginner-friendly book designed to teach you the basics of hacking. Learn the mindset, the tools, the techniques, and the ETHOS of hackers. The book is written so that anyone can understand the material and grasp the fundamental techniques of hacking. Its content is tailored specifically for the beginner, pointing you in the right direction, to show you the path to becoming an elite and powerful hacker. You will gain access and instructions to tools used by industry professionals in the field of penetration testing and ethical hacking and by some of the best hackers in the world. -------------------------------- If you are curious about the FREE version of this book, you can reed the original, first-draft of this book for free on Google Drive! https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B78IWlY3bU_8RnZmOXczTUFEM1U

The Hacker Ethic And The Spirit Of The Information Age

Author: Pekka Himanen
Editor: Random House Incorporated
ISBN: 9780375505669
File Size: 44,30 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 1847
Download

Examines the ethos of the information age as represented by the values of the original computer hackers--enthusiastic programmers who share their work with others in a spirit of openness and cooperation.

The Hacker Ethic

Author: Pekka Himanen
Editor: Random House
ISBN: 1407064290
File Size: 79,72 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 4283
Download

The Hacker Ethic takes us on a journey through fundamental questions about life in the information age - a trip of constant surprises, after which our time and our lives can be seen from unexpected perspectives.Nearly a century ago, Max Weber's The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism articulated the animating spirit of the industrial age, the Protestant ethic. In the original meaning of the word, hackers are enthusiastic computer programmers who share their work with others; they are not computer criminals. Now Pekka Himanen - together with Linus Torvalds and Manuel Castells - articulates how hackers represent a new opposing ethos for the information age.Underlying hackers' technical creations - such as the Internet and the personal computer, which have become symbols of our time - are the hacker values that produced them. These values promote passionate and freely rhythmed work; the belief that individuals can create great things by joining forces in imaginative ways; and the need to maintain our existing ethical ideals, such as privacy and equality, in our new increasingly technologized society.

Coding Democracy

Author: Maureen Webb
Editor: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262043556
File Size: 33,60 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 3351
Download

Hackers as vital disruptors, inspiring a new wave of activism in which ordinary citizens take back democracy. Hackers have a bad reputation, as shady deployers of bots and destroyers of infrastructure. In Coding Democracy, Maureen Webb offers another view. Hackers, she argues, can be vital disruptors. Hacking is becoming a practice, an ethos, and a metaphor for a new wave of activism in which ordinary citizens are inventing new forms of distributed, decentralized democracy for a digital era. Confronted with concentrations of power, mass surveillance, and authoritarianism enabled by new technology, the hacking movement is trying to “build out” democracy into cyberspace. Webb travels to Berlin, where she visits the Chaos Communication Camp, a flagship event in the hacker world; to Silicon Valley, where she reports on the Apple-FBI case, the significance of Russian troll farms, and the hacking of tractor software by desperate farmers; to Barcelona, to meet the hacker group XNet, which has helped bring nearly 100 prominent Spanish bankers and politicians to justice for their role in the 2008 financial crisis; and to Harvard and MIT, to investigate the institutionalization of hacking. Webb describes an amazing array of hacker experiments that could dramatically change the current political economy. These ambitious hacks aim to displace such tech monoliths as Facebook and Amazon; enable worker cooperatives to kill platforms like Uber; give people control over their data; automate trust; and provide citizens a real say in governance, along with capacity to reach consensus. Coding Democracy is not just another optimistic declaration of technological utopianism; instead, it provides the tools for an urgently needed upgrade of democracy in the digital era.

The Charisma Machine

Author: Morgan G. Ames
Editor: MIT Press
ISBN: 0262537443
File Size: 35,32 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 3643
Download

A fascinating examination of technological utopianism and its complicated consequences. In The Charisma Machine, Morgan Ames chronicles the life and legacy of the One Laptop per Child project and explains why—despite its failures—the same utopian visions that inspired OLPC still motivate other projects trying to use technology to “disrupt” education and development. Announced in 2005 by MIT Media Lab cofounder Nicholas Negroponte, One Laptop per Child promised to transform the lives of children across the Global South with a small, sturdy, and cheap laptop computer, powered by a hand crank. In reality, the project fell short in many ways—starting with the hand crank, which never materialized. Yet the project remained charismatic to many who were captivated by its claims of access to educational opportunities previously out of reach. Behind its promises, OLPC, like many technology projects that make similarly grand claims, had a fundamentally flawed vision of who the computer was made for and what role technology should play in learning. Drawing on fifty years of history and a seven-month study of a model OLPC project in Paraguay, Ames reveals that the laptops were not only frustrating to use, easy to break, and hard to repair, they were designed for “technically precocious boys”—idealized younger versions of the developers themselves—rather than the children who were actually using them. The Charisma Machine offers a cautionary tale about the allure of technology hype and the problems that result when utopian dreams drive technology development.

Hacking Life

Author: Joseph M. Reagl Jr.
Editor: Strong Ideas
ISBN: 0262538997
File Size: 12,63 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 9023
Download

Life hackers track and analyze the food they eat, the hours they sleep, the money they spend, and how they're feeling on any given day. They share tips on the most efficient ways to tie shoelaces and load the dishwasher. They see everything as a system composed of parts that can be decomposed and recomposed, with algorithmic rules that can be understood, optimized, and subverted. In this book, Joseph Reagle examines how life hacking is self-help for the digital age's creative class. Life hacks can be useful, useless, and sometimes harmful: being efficient is not the same thing as being effective; being precious about minimalism does not mean you are living life unfettered; and compulsively checking your vital signs is its own sort of illness. With Hacking Life, Reagle sheds light on a question even non-hackers ponder: what does it mean to live a good life in the new millennium? Book jacket.

Hacker Culture

Author: Douglas Thomas
Editor:
ISBN: 9780816633456
File Size: 56,42 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 7695
Download

"Douglas Thomas is associate professor in the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Southern California."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Ethnologia Europaea

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 59,23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 3638
Download


Digital Age Activism

Author: Jeffrey Scott Juris
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 49,15 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 9627
Download


International Social Science Journal

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 27,23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 9816
Download


The Information Trade

Author: Alexis Wichowski
Editor: HarperCollins
ISBN: 0062889052
File Size: 33,73 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 4641
Download

In this timely, provocative, and ultimately hopeful book, a widely respected government and tech expert reveals how Facebook, Google, Amazon, Tesla, and other tech giants are disrupting the way the world works, and outlines the growing risk they pose to our future if we do not act to contain them. Today’s major technology companies—Google, Facebook, Amazon, Tesla, and others—wield more power than national governments. Because of their rising influence, Alexis Wichowski, a former press official for the State Department during the Obama administration, has re-branded these major tech companies “net states.” In this comprehensive, engaging, and prescriptive book, she considers their growing and unavoidable influence in our lives, showing in eye-opening detail how these net states are conquering countries, disrupting reality, and jeopardizing our future—and what we can do to regulate and reform the industry before it does irreparable harm to the way we think, how we act, and how we’re governed. Combining original reporting and insights drawn from more than 100 interviews with technology and government insiders, including Microsoft president Brad Smith, Google CEO Eric Schmidt, the former Federal Trade Commission chair under President Obama, the co-founder of the Center for Humane Technology , and the managing director of Jigsaw—Google’s Department of Counterterrorism against extremis and cyber-attacks—The Information Trade explores what happens when we cede our power to them, willingly trading our personal freedom and individual autonomy for an easy, plugged-in existence. Neither an industry apologist or fearmonger, Wichowski reminds us that we are not helpless victims; we still control our relationship with the technologies and the companies behind them. Most important, she shows us how we can curtail and control net states in practical, actionable ways—and makes urgently clear what’s at stake if we don’t.

The Ncsa Guide To Enterprise Security

Author: Michel E. Kabay
Editor: McGraw-Hill Companies
ISBN:
File Size: 11,79 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 3974
Download

Focusing on real-life problems, this book provides enterprise system managers and technicians with practical solutions for safeguarding proprietary corporate information in all types of organizations. Includes dozens of case studies to illustrate the many dangers that await inadequately protected systems.

Handbook Of Information Security Information Warfare Social Legal And International Issues And Security Foundations

Author: Hossein Bidgoli
Editor: Wiley
ISBN: 9780471648314
File Size: 23,69 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 8685
Download

The Handbook of Information Security is a definitive 3-volume handbook that offers coverage of both established and cutting-edge theories and developments on information and computer security. The text contains 180 articles from over 200 leading experts, providing the benchmark resource for information security, network security, information privacy, and information warfare.

The Usenet Book

Author: Bryan Pfaffenberger
Editor: Addison Wesley Longman
ISBN:
File Size: 70,78 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 8127
Download

Details how to find, access, and subscribe to newsgroups; describes the top 300 most useful newsgroups; and presents documentation for ten of the most widely used newsreaders

The Psychology Of Netaholics

Author: Carla G. Suratt
Editor: Nova Novinka
ISBN:
File Size: 68,52 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 2660
Download

The year 1998 witnessed the birth of a new disorder... Internet Addiction Disorder. As the number of linkage points, host computers, connected networks and individual users plugged into the Internet has continued to increase exponentially, some have begun to question the Net's impact on our psychological well-being. Among the issues under debate is the question of whether or not Internet use is addictive. Though many regular Internet participants scoff at such an idea, and create satirical websites, IRC chat rooms and Usenet newsgroups make their point, a growing number of professionals in the field of psychology disagree. They argue that Internet participation is addictive, and that in many ways its symptoms, diagnosis and treatment parallel that of other addictions, such as compulsive gambling, shopping and even drug and alcohol use. What are we to make of this new disorder? What precisely, does "addiction" mean? Can individuals really become addicted to the Internet? This groundbreaking book examines these questions from a sociological perspective.

Bare Acts

Author: Monica Narula
Editor: Autonomedia
ISBN:
File Size: 44,80 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 4640
Download

Cultural Writing. Political Science. This year, the annual Sarai Reader looks at 'Acts'--at instruments of legislation, at things within and outside the law, and at 'acts'--as different ways of 'doing' things in society and culture. Several essays echo and complement themes that have emerged in earlier readers. Piracy, borders, surveillance, claims to authority and entitlement, the language of expertise, the legal regulation of sexual behaviour and trespasses of various kinds have featured prominently in previous Readers. This collection foregrounds these issues in a way we hope can make a series of coherent but autonomous and interrelated arguments.

Mondo 2000

Author: R. U. Sirius
Editor: Perennial
ISBN:
File Size: 59,56 MB
Format: PDF
Read: 9545
Download

Essays discuss topics dealing with the interaction of people and computers and the impact of technology on art, literature, and music

Transnational Dynamics Development Net

Author: Paula Uimonen
Editor: Almqvist & Wiksell International
ISBN:
File Size: 66,39 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 8865
Download


Physiological Foundations

Author: Gellhorn
Editor: U of Minnesota Press
ISBN: 9781452911069
File Size: 50,70 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 7223
Download

Demonized by governments and the media as criminals, glorified within their own subculture as outlaws, hackers have played a major role in the short history of computers and digital culture-and have continually defied our assumptions about technology and secrecy through both legal and illicit means. In Hacker Culture, Douglas Thomas provides an in-depth history of this important and fascinating subculture, contrasting mainstream images of hackers with a detailed firsthand account of the computer underground. Addressing such issues as the commodification of the hacker ethos by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, the high-profile arrests of prominent hackers, and conflicting self-images among hackers themselves, Thomas finds that popular hacker stereotypes reflect the public's anxieties about the information age far more than they do the reality of hacking.