The Irish Aesthete Ruins Of Ireland

Author: Robert O'Byrne
Editor: CICO Books
ISBN: 9781782496861
File Size: 23,41 MB
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Go on a journey with Robert O’Byrne as he brings fascinating Irish ruins to life. Fantastical, often whimsical, and frequently quirky, these atmospheric ruins are beautifully photographed and paired with fascinating text by Robert O’Byrne. Born out of Robert’s hugely popular blog, The Irish Aesthete, there are Medieval castles, Georgian mansions, Victorian lodges, and a myriad of other buildings, many never previously published. Robert focuses on a mixture of exteriors and interiors in varying stages of decay, on architectural details, and entire scenarios. Accompanying texts tell of the Regency siblings who squandered their entire fortune on gambling and carousing, of an Anglo-Norman heiress who pitched her husband out the window on their wedding night, and of the landlord who liked to walk around naked and whose wife made him carry a cowbell to warn housemaids of his approach. Arranged by the country’s four provinces, the diverse ruins featured offer a unique insight into Ireland and an exploration of her many styles of historic architecture.

Wandering Wicklow With Father Browne

Author: Robert O'Byrne
Editor: Messenger Publications
ISBN: 1788123026
File Size: 15,31 MB
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Ireland’s finest photographer in the 20th century, Fr Frank Browne repeatedly visited County Wicklow across almost half a century. Over that time, he had the opportunity to capture images of this part of the country as it underwent change and yet, somehow, retained its essential character. The earliest photograph, for example, is of the Dargle Valley, a spot that looks much the same today as it did when Fr Browne first went there in 1910. Other pictures show landmark beauty spots such as the Powerscourt Waterfall and the Sugarloaf Mountain, as well as the rugged landscape of the Sally Gap. The monastic remains of Glendalough are exquisitely caught, along with the still waters of Lough Tay. But while his eye was able to spot the timeless beauty of this rural idyll, Fr Browne also noted the modern and innovative, capturing key moments in the development of a newly independent Ireland, such as the construction of the Poulaphouca Reservoir in the late 1930s and workers in the newly opened Solus Teoranta Lightbulb Factory in Bray. Cars are few, but bicycles plentiful in his photographs. The advent of modern technology contrasts with traditional pastimes: a horse fair in Blessington, sheep dipping on a farm, a thatcher repairing the roof of an old cottage. He shows bustling preparations for the International Eucharistic Congress of June 1932, along with commercial activity in towns such as Arklow and Wicklow. New schools are shown being built in the first, older pursuits like fishing continue in the second. And Fr Browne’s ability to gain access everywhere means he was able to photograph many of Wicklow’s most famous historic houses, like Powerscourt before its interiors were tragically destroyed by fire, and Shelton Abbey which he visited just a year before the building and its contents were sold. The book is divided into five/six sections, each offering readers the chance to follow in Fr Browne’s footsteps and explore a different part of the county.

Sir Richard Musgrave 1746 1818

Author: James Kelly
Editor: Four Courts PressLtd
ISBN:
File Size: 34,48 MB
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"This study of Sir Richard Musgrave seeks, first, through an exploration of Musgrave's life, to locate Memoirs of the various rebellions in Ireland in its eighteenth-century context, and, secondly, to establish the vital contribution it made to the opposition of ultra-Protestants to the efforts of Catholics and liberal Protestants to promote Catholic emancipation." --Book Jacket.

The Irish Scene In Somerville And Ross

Author: Julie Anne Stevens
Editor:
ISBN: 9780716533672
File Size: 70,28 MB
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Ireland's foremost female writers of the nineteenth century, Edith Somerville and Martin Ross, advocated the 'High Art of Comedy' during the period of transition and turbulence in the Irish countryside. This critical biography of their collaboration, from 1890 to Martin Ross's death in 1915, studies the self-conscious artistry of the creators of the finest novel of the nineteenth century The Real Charlotte (1894). It considers the influence of both popular culture and high art in the treatment of the volatile Irish landscape and looks for the first time at the contexts of the immensely popular Irish R M stories and Edith Somerville's accompanying illustrations. The writers' sly send-ups of romantic notions of Irishness are revealed, while using certain expectations of a picturesque countryside to their own advantage. The book recontextualizes the writers' fiction and illustrations through inter-disciplinary and cross-cultural methods by considering the influence of the visual arts, theatrical production, antiquarian study, and literature derived from Irish, British, and European sources. In addition to Somerville and Ross's interest in popular and elite art forms, the book stresses the writers' all-consuming interest in land politics, suffragism, the Irish character and the Irish language, the workings of the law in the Irish countryside, and - above all - money and its lack in the small farms and cottages of Ireland.

Irish Literature Since 1800

Author: Norman Vance
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317870506
File Size: 32,41 MB
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This book surveys Irish writing in English over the last two centuries, from Maria Edgeworth to Seamus Heaney, to give the literary student and the general reader an up-to-date sense of its variety and vitality and to indicate some of the ways in which it has been described and discussed. It begins with a brief outline of Irish history, of Irish writing in Irish and Latin, and of writing in English before 1800. Later chapters consider Irish romanticism, Victorian Ireland, W.B.Yeats and the Irish Literary Revival, new directions in Irish writing after Joyce and the literature of contemporary Ireland, north and south, from 1960 to the present.

The Untouchable

Author: John Banville
Editor: Pan Macmillan
ISBN: 0330506935
File Size: 51,10 MB
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‘The Untouchable is an engrossing, exquisitely written and almost bewilderingly smart book . . . It’s the fullest book I’ve read in a very long time, utterly accomplished, thoroughly readable, written by a novelist of vast talent’ Richard Ford Victor Maskell has been betrayed. After the announcement in the Commons and the hasty revelation of his double life of wartime espionage, his disgrace is public, his knighthood revoked, his position as curator of the Queen’s pictures terminated. There are questions to be answered. For whom has he been sacrificed? To what has he sacrificed his life? The Untouchable is beautifully crafted novel inspired by the famous Cambridge Spies by John Banville, the author of the Booker prize-winning The Sea.

Nature And The Environment In Nineteenth Century Ireland

Author: Matthew Kelly
Editor: Society for the Study of Nineteenth Century Ireland
ISBN: 1789620325
File Size: 40,11 MB
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The environmental humanities are one of the most exciting and rapidly expanding areas of interdisciplinary study, and this collection of essays is a pioneering attempt to apply these approaches to the study of nineteenth-century Ireland. By bringing together historians, geographers and literary scholars, new insights are offered into familiar subjects and unfamiliar subjects are brought out into the light. Essays re-considering O'Connellism, Lord Palmerston and Isaac Butt rub shoulders with examinations of agricultural improvement, Dublin's animal geographies and Ireland's healing places. Literary writers like Emily Lawless and Seumas O'Sullivan are looked at anew, encouraging us to re-think Darwinian influences in Ireland and the history of the Irish literary revival, and transnational perspectives are brought to bear on Ireland's national park history and the dynamics of Irish natural history. Much modern Irish history is concerned with access to natural resources, whether this reflects the catastrophic effect of the Great Famine or the conflicts associated with agrarian politics, but historical and literary analyses are rarely framed explicitly in these terms. The collection responds to the 'material turn' in the humanities and contemporary concern about the environment by re-imagining Ireland's nineteenth century in fresh and original ways.

The Illustrated London News

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 48,95 MB
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Northern Ireland

Author: Emyr Estyn Evans
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 30,52 MB
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Ancestral Voices

Author: Otto Rauchbauer
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 25,60 MB
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Living Heritage

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 74,23 MB
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Macmillan Encyclopedia Of Architects

Author: Adolf K. Placzek
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 78,70 MB
Format: PDF
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New York Times Book Review And Magazine

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 75,83 MB
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Sligo

Author: John Cowell
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 34,60 MB
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Yeats

Author: Richard J. Finneran
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 21,33 MB
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Georgian Dublin

Author: Gillian O'Brien
Editor: Four Courts PressLtd
ISBN:
File Size: 12,20 MB
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This collection looks at the less obvious remnants of Dublinâ??s Georgian past - the literature, the publishing industry, the clothes, the music and the hobbies associated with this period. The contributors are: Gillian Oâ??Brien (St Patrickâ??s College, DCU) Dublin in the late Georgian period; Sarah Foster (Crawford College) Consumption and economic nationalism in Dublin, 1720â??85; Vandra Costello (UCD) Recreation in Georgian Dublin; Lisa Marie Griffith (TCD) The position of lord mayor, 1760â??1800; Colum Kenny (DCU) Kingâ??s Innsâ?? move to Constitution Hill; Niamh Howlin (UCD) Special juries in Dublin, 1725â??1833; Finola Oâ??Kane (UCD) Dublinâ??s Georgian suburbia; Alison Fitzgerald (UCD) Goldsmiths in 18th-century Dublin; Aileen Douglas (TCD) Dublin in fiction of the later 18th century; Sharon Murphy (TCD) Maria Edgeworthâ??s representations of Georgian Dublin; Julie Anne Stevens (St Patrickâ??s, DCU) Perspectives of Georgian Dublin; W.J. McCormack (Worth Library) Sources for the library of Edward Worth; Johanna Archbold (TCD) James Moore and the publication of the Encylopaedia Britannica, 1790â??1800; Andreas Boldt (NUIM) The Graves family; Michelle Mangan, Dublin and Limerick during the 1832 cholera epidemic.