The Landscape Archaeology Of Anglo Saxon England

Author: N. J. Higham
Editor: Boydell & Brewer
ISBN: 1843835827
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The Anglo-Saxon period was crucial to the development of the English landscape, but is rarely studied. The essays here provide radical new interpretations of its development.

Tradition And Transformation In Anglo Saxon England

Author: Susan Oosthuizen
Editor: A&C Black
ISBN: 1472507274
File Size: 16,20 MB
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Explores the origins ofAnglo-Saxon England between 400 and 900 AD through the organisation of arableand commons.

Perceptions Of The Prehistoric In Anglo Saxon England

Author: Sarah Semple
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199683107
File Size: 62,20 MB
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Represents an unparalleled exploration of the place of prehistoric monuments in the Anglo-Saxon psyche, and examines how Anglo-Saxon communities perceived and used these monuments during the period AD 400-1100.

The Oxford Handbook Of Anglo Saxon Archaeology

Author: Helena Hamerow
Editor: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0199212147
File Size: 53,32 MB
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Written by a team of experts and presenting the results of the most up-to-date research, The Handbook of Anglo-Saxon Archaeology will both stimulate and support further investigation into a society poised at the interface between prehistory and history.

Rural Settlements And Society In Anglo Saxon England

Author: Helena Hamerow
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0199203253
File Size: 43,18 MB
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The first major synthesis of the evidence for Anglo-Saxon settlements from across England and throughout the Anglo-Saxon period, and a study of what it reveals about the communities who built and lived in them.

Anglo Saxon Studies In Archaeology And History

Author: David Griffiths
Editor: Oxford Univ School of Archaeology
ISBN: 9780947816957
File Size: 10,93 MB
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Papers included in this volume of Anglo-Saxon Studies are:"Anglo-Saxon Pagan Shrines and their Prototypes" by John Blair; "Pagan English Sanctuaries, Place-Names and Hundred Meeting-Places" by Audrey Meaney; "The Alderwerke and Minster at Shelford, Cambridgeshire" by Cyril Hart; "Literacy in Anglo-Saxon England: the Evidence from Inscriptions" by Elisabeth Okasha; "The North-West Mercian burhs : a Reappraisal" by David Griffiths; "Metal-Detector Finds and Fieldwork on Anglo-Saxon Sites in Suffolk" by John Newman; "Where are the Anglo-Saxons in the Gododdin Poem?" by Criag Cressford; "Entrances to Sunken-floored Structures in Anglo-Saxon Times" by Philip H. Dixon; "Re-interpreting Mucking: Countering the Black Legend" by Paul M. Barford; and "From Artefact to Interpretation using Correspondance Analysis" by Karen Híilund Nielson.

Place Names Language And The Anglo Saxon Landscape

Author: N. J. Higham
Editor: Boydell Press
ISBN: 1843836033
File Size: 51,83 MB
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An exploration of the landscape of Anglo-Saxon England, particularly through the prism of place-names and what they can reveal.

Environment Society And Landscape In Early Medieval England

Author: Tom Williamson
Editor: Boydell Press
ISBN: 1843837374
File Size: 52,59 MB
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Annotation Environment and geography are shown to have played a crucial role in shaping Anglo-Saxon history and culture.

The Landscape Of Anglo Saxon England

Author: Della Hooke
Editor: Burns & Oates
ISBN: 9780718501617
File Size: 48,94 MB
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This book concerns the landscape that surrounded early medieval man, often described as he saw and experienced it. The Anglo-Saxon period was one of considerable change in settlement and land use patterns but the landscape regions that emerge, documented for the first time in history, are still familiar to us today. The image conjured up, and for the present it can hardly be any more than an image, is tentative and incomplete, for many more threads have been embroidered upon it in the thousand succeeding years; but the early patterns often guided the latter and occasionally still show through. This book examines the Anglo-Saxon's view of his natural surroundings and how he utilized the resources available -- the cropland, woodland and marginal land of pasture and fen -- and how this is reflected in administrative patterns, how it influenced settlement, communications and trade and, moreover, influenced the landscape patterns of successive ages.

Building Anglo Saxon England

Author: John Blair
Editor: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400889901
File Size: 16,55 MB
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A radical rethinking of the Anglo-Saxon world that draws on the latest archaeological discoveries This beautifully illustrated book draws on the latest archaeological discoveries to present a radical reappraisal of the Anglo-Saxon built environment and its inhabitants. John Blair, one of the world's leading experts on this transformative era in England's early history, explains the origins of towns, manor houses, and castles in a completely new way, and sheds new light on the important functions of buildings and settlements in shaping people's lives during the age of the Venerable Bede and King Alfred. Building Anglo-Saxon England demonstrates how hundreds of recent excavations enable us to grasp for the first time how regionally diverse the built environment of the Anglo-Saxons truly was. Blair identifies a zone of eastern England with access to the North Sea whose economy, prosperity, and timber buildings had more in common with the Low Countries and Scandinavia than the rest of England. The origins of villages and their field systems emerge with a new clarity, as does the royal administrative organization of the kingdom of Mercia, which dominated central England for two centuries. Featuring a wealth of color illustrations throughout, Building Anglo-Saxon England explores how the natural landscape was modified to accommodate human activity, and how many settlements--secular and religious—were laid out with geometrical precision by specialist surveyors. The book also shows how the Anglo-Saxon love of elegant and intricate decoration is reflected in the construction of the living environment, which in some ways was more sophisticated than it would become after the Norman Conquest.

Anglo Saxon Deviant Burial Customs

Author: Andrew Reynolds
Editor: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191567655
File Size: 45,92 MB
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Anglo-Saxon Deviant Burial Customs is the first detailed consideration of the ways in which Anglo-Saxon society dealt with social outcasts. Beginning with the period following Roman rule and ending in the century following the Norman Conquest, it surveys a period of fundamental social change, which included the conversion to Christianity, the emergence of the late Saxon state, and the development of the landscape of the Domesday Book. While an impressive body of written evidence for the period survives in the form of charters and law-codes, archaeology is uniquely placed to investigate the earliest period of post-Roman society - the fifth to seventh centuries - for which documents are lacking. For later centuries, archaeological evidence can provide us with an independent assessment of the realities of capital punishment and the status of outcasts. Andrew Reynolds argues that outcast burials show a clear pattern of development in this period. In the pre-Christian centuries, 'deviant' burial remains are found only in community cemeteries, but the growth of kingship and the consolidation of territories during the seventh century witnessed the emergence of capital punishment and places of execution in the English landscape. Locally determined rites, such as crossroads burial, now existed alongside more formal execution cemeteries. Gallows were located on major boundaries, often next to highways, always in highly visible places. The findings of this pioneering national study thus have important consequences on our understanding of Anglo-Saxon society. Overall, Reynolds concludes, organized judicial behaviour was a feature of the earliest Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, rather than just the two centuries prior to the Norman Conquest.

Planning In The Early Medieval Landscape

Author: John Blair
Editor:
ISBN: 9781789621167
File Size: 80,90 MB
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The extent to which Anglo-Saxon society was capable oflarge-scale transformations of the landscape is hotly disputed. Thisinterdisciplinary book - embracing archaeological and historical sources -explores this important period in our landscape history and the extent to whichbuildings, settlements and field systems were laid out using sophisticatedsurveying techniques. In particular, recent research has found new and unexpectedevidence for the construction of building complexes and settlements ongeometrically precise grids, suggesting a revival of the techniques of theRoman land-surveyors (Agrimensores).Two units of measurement appear to have been used: the 'short perch' of 15 feetin central and eastern England, where mostcases occur, and the 'long perch' of 18 feet at the small number of examplesidentified in Wessex. This technically advanced planning is evident during twoperiods: c.600-800, when it may have been a mostlymonastic practice, and c.940-1020, when it appears to have been revived in amonastic context but then spread to a wider range of lay settlements. Planning in the Early Medieval Landscape is a completely new perspective on how villages and other settlement were formed. It combines map and field evidence with manuscript treatises on land-surveying to show that the methods described in the treatises were not just theoretical, but were put into practice. In doing so it reveals a major aspect of previously unrecognised early medieval technology.

Anglo Saxon Settlement And Landscape

Author: Trevor Rowley
Editor: British Archaeological Association
ISBN:
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Remembering The Dead In Anglo Saxon England

Author: Zoe Devlin
Editor: British Archaeological Reports Limited
ISBN:
File Size: 19,39 MB
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This study uses sociological theories of personal memory to show how Anglo-Saxon burial practices enabled the grieving process, and ensured the remembrance of the dead.

The Grubenhaus In Anglo Saxon England

Author: Jess Tipper
Editor:
ISBN: 9780953748822
File Size: 59,80 MB
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Trees In Anglo Saxon England

Author: Della Hooke
Editor: Boydell & Brewer
ISBN: 1843835657
File Size: 23,13 MB
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A powerful exploration of trees in both the real and the imagined Anglo-Saxon landscape.

Later Anglo Saxon England

Author: Andrew Reynolds
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 25,46 MB
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This study examines the progression from fragmented kingdoms to organised nation state in England.'

Discovering Anglo Saxon England

Author: Martin G. Welch
Editor: Penn State University Press
ISBN:
File Size: 71,99 MB
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Discovering Anglo-Saxon England covers the period from about 400 to 700, from the departure of Roman troops to the triumph of Christianity and the "Age of Bede." It was during this period that waves of migrants--Angles, Saxons, Jutes, and other peoples from northern Germany and southern Scandinavia--created England (the "land of the Angles") from the vestiges of late Roman Britain. This period is often considered a "dark age" because of the dearth of written records. Accounts from later centuries (such as Beowulf and the writings of the Venerable Bede) provide some insight, but archaeology is the source of most of our knowledge. Excavations, such as those of dwellings at West Stow and the Yeavering "palace," offer us a window into what Martin Welch calls Anglo-Saxon "communities in life." Likewise, the cemeteries of farmstead settlements and the magnificent "royal" ship burial at Sutton Hoo present the equivalent "communities in death." Written in an accessible style, Discovering Anglo-Saxon England includes one hundred maps, plans, reconstructions, and photographs, making it an excellent introduction to the archaeology of early England. An appendix of places to visit makes it ideally suited to those planning an excursion of their own.

Kingdom Civitas And County

Author: Stephen Rippon
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0198759371
File Size: 67,14 MB
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This book explores the development of territorial identity in the late prehistoric, Roman, and early medieval periods. Over the course of the Iron Age, a series of marked regional variations in material culture and landscape character emerged across eastern England that reflect the development of discrete zones of social and economic interaction. The boundaries between these zones appear to have run through sparsely settled areas of the landscape on high ground, and corresponded to a series of kingdoms that emerged during the Late Iron Age. In eastern England at least, these pre-Roman socio-economic territories appear to have survived throughout the Roman period despite a trend towards cultural homogenization brought about by Romanization. Although there is no direct evidence for the relationship between these socio-economic zones and the Roman administrative territories known as civitates, they probably corresponded very closely. The fifth century saw some Anglo-Saxon immigration but whereas in East Anglia these communities spread out across much of the landscape, in the Northern Thames Basin they appear to have been restricted to certain coastal and estuarine districts. The remaining areas continued to be occupied by a substantial native British population, including much of the East Saxon kingdom (very little of which appears to have been 'Saxon'). By the sixth century a series of regionally distinct identities - that can be regarded as separate ethnic groups - had developed which corresponded very closely to those that had emerged during the late prehistoric and Roman periods. These ancient regional identities survived through to the Viking incursions, whereafter they were swept away following the English re-conquest and replaced with the counties with which we are familiar today.

English Heritage Book Of Anglo Saxon England

Author: Martin G. Welch
Editor:
ISBN: 9780713465662
File Size: 59,39 MB
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This is an introduction to the archaeology of Anglo-Saxon England, incorporating the latest findings and research, with particular emphasis on the early centuries, from the departure of the Romans to the coming of the Vikings. The author examines the rich archaeological evidence from both excavated settlements and cemeteries, including the Yeavering palace and the royal ship burial at Sutton Hoo, to present a vivid picture of the Anglo-Saxon people, their traditions, beliefs, communities and settlements and their contribution to the history of England.