The Life And Death Of Ancient Cities

Author: Greg Woolf
Editor: Oxford University Press, USA
ISBN: 9780197621837
File Size: 62,69 MB
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The dramatic story of the rise and collapse of Europe's first great urban experiment The growth of cities around the world in the last two centuries is the greatest episode in our urban history, but it is not the first. Three thousand years ago most of the Mediterranean basin was a world of villages; a world without money or writing, without temples for the gods or palaces for the mighty. Over the centuries that followed, however, cities appeared in many places around the Inland Sea, built by Greeks and Romans, and also by Etruscans and Phoenicians, Tartessians and Lycians, and many others. Most were tiny by modern standards, but they were the building blocks of all the states and empires of antiquity. The greatest--Athens and Corinth, Syracuse and Marseilles, Alexandria and Ephesus, Persepolis and Carthage, Rome and Byzantium--became the powerhouses of successive ancient societies, not just political centers but also the places where ancient art and literatures were created and accumulated. And then, half way through the first millennium, most withered away, leaving behind ruins that have fascinated so many who came after. Based on the most recent historical and archaeological evidence, The Life and Death of Ancient Cities provides a sweeping narrative of one of the world's first great urban experiments, from Bronze Age origins to the demise of cities in late antiquity. Greg Woolf chronicles the history of the ancient Mediterranean city, against the background of wider patterns of human evolution, and of the unforgiving environment in which they were built. Richly illustrated, the book vividly brings to life the abandoned remains of our ancient urban ancestors and serves as a stark reminder of the fragility of even the mightiest of cities.
The Life and Death of Ancient Cities
Language: en
Pages: 528
Authors: Greg Woolf
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022-08 - Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

The dramatic story of the rise and collapse of Europe's first great urban experiment The growth of cities around the world in the last two centuries is the greatest episode in our urban history, but it is not the first. Three thousand years ago most of the Mediterranean basin was
The Life and Death of Ancient Cities
Language: en
Pages: 512
Authors: Greg Woolf
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-07-17 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

The human race is on a 10,000 year urban adventure. Our ancestors wandered the planet or lived scattered in villages, yet by the end of this century almost all of us will live in cities. But that journey has not been a smooth one and urban civilizations have risen and
Life and Death in the Ancient City of Teotihuacan
Language: en
Pages: 307
Authors: Rebecca Storey
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 1992-01-30 - Publisher: University of Alabama Press

Cities arose independently in both the Old World and in the pre-Columbian New World. Lacking written records, many of these New World cities can be studied only through archaeology, including the earliest pre-Columbian city, Teotihuacan, Mexico, one of the largest cities of its time (150 B.C. to A.D. 750). Thus,
Remembering and Forgetting the Ancient City
Language: en
Pages: 240
Authors: Javier Martínez Jiménez, Sam Ottewill-Soulsby
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2022-04-30 - Publisher: Oxbow Books

The Greco-Roman world is identified in the modern mind by its cities. This includes both specific places such as Athens and Rome, but also an instantly recognizable style of urbanism wrought in marble and lived in by teeming tunic-clad crowds. Selective and misleading this vision may be, but it speaks
Rome
Language: en
Pages: 512
Authors: Greg Woolf
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2021-07-15 - Publisher: Oxford University Press

Rome in the archaic age was a minor satellite between the Etruscan and Greek world. This book traces the expansion of Roman influence first within Italy, then around the Mediterranean world and finally, at breakneck speed, deep into Europe, out to the Atlantic, along the edge of the Sahara and