The Neuropsychology Of The Unconscious Integrating Brain And Mind In Psychotherapy Norton Series On Interpersonal Neurobiology

Author: Efrat Ginot
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393710882
Size: 10,79 MB
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A scientific take on the still-central therapeutic concept of “the unconscious.” More than one hundred years after Freud began publishing some of his seminal theories, the concept of the unconscious still occupies a central position in many theoretical frameworks and clinical approaches. When trying to understand clients’ internal and interpersonal struggles it is almost inconceivable not to look for unconscious motivation, conflicts, and relational patterns. Clinicians also consider it a breakthrough to recognize how our own unconscious patterns have interacted with those of our clients. Although clinicians use concepts such as the unconscious and dissociation, in actuality many do not take into account the newly emerging neuropsychological attributes of nonconscious processes. As a result, assumptions and lack of clarity overtake information that can become central in our clinical work. This revolutionary book presents a new model of the unconscious, one that is continuing to emerge from the integration of neuropsychological research with clinical experience. Drawing from clinical observations of specific therapeutic cases, affect theory, research into cognitive neuroscience and neuropsychological findings, the book presents an expanded picture of nonconscious processes. The model moves from a focus on dissociated affects, behaviors, memories, and the fantasies that are unconsciously created, to viewing unconscious as giving expression to whole patterns of feeling, thinking and behaving, patterns that are so integrated and entrenched as to make them our personality traits. Topics covered include: the centrality of subcortical regions, automaticity, repetition, and biased memory systems; role of the amygdala and its sensitivity to fears in shaping and coloring unconscious self-systems; self-narratives; therapeutic enactments; therapeutic resistance; defensive systems and narcissism; therapeutic approaches designed to utilize some of the new understandings regarding unconscious processes and their interaction with higher level conscious ones embedded in the prefrontal cortex.

The Neuropsychology Of The Unconscious

Author: Efrat Ginot
Editor: W W Norton & Company Incorporated
ISBN: 9780393709018
Size: 12,57 MB
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A scientific take on the still-central therapeutic concept of “theunconscious.”

The Neuropsychology Of Consciousness

Author: A. D. Milner
Editor: Academic Press
ISBN: 1483257827
Size: 14,27 MB
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The Neuropsychology of Consciousness is based on a symposium entitled “Consciousness and Cognition: Neuropsychological Perspectives held at the University of St Andrews, September 1990. The intention was to assemble a group of the major researchers at the forefront of this field. The starting point for the symposium and for the book was the widespread realization that in several areas of human cognition (e.g. visual perception, memory, language comprehension, and attention), the severe and profound impairments due to brain damage that have been described over the past 150 years are often not absolute. In particular, the use of indirect methods of testing may reveal unsuspected preservation of capacities that are undetected by more traditional direct methods. The book opens with a discussion of the epidemic of dissociations and how well the phenomena within either neuropsychology or within normal human experimental psychology map onto each other. This is followed by separate chapters on topics such as blindsight, covert visual processing in patients, face recognition and awareness following brain injury, and the relationship between the study of attention and the understanding of consciousness.

The Neuropsychology Of Psychopathology

Author: Chad A. Noggle, PhD, ABN
Editor: Springer Publishing Company
ISBN: 082610701X
Size: 12,36 MB
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This clinical reference book presents state-of-the-science knowledge about the neurobiology and genetics of the major mental disorders and how this corresponds with their psychiatric features and neuropsychological traits. The text demonstrates how the application of neuropsychology to these disorders provides a more comprehensive foundation for greater accuracy in assessment, diagnosis, and treatment. The book focuses on the neuropathological and pathophysiological basis of the various symptoms, emphasizing the biological basis of each disorder. This approach stresses the importance of looking at the other functional impacts of these manifestations (for example, cognitive deficits secondary to depression). The text compares adult versus child presentation of psychiatric disorders and covers the major forms of psychopathology including ADHD; Learning Disabilities; Pervasive Developmental Disorders; Mood, Anxiety, Personality, and Schizophrenic Disorders; Cortical and Subcortical Dementias; and Delirium. The book is written for clinical professionals to increase diagnostic accuracy and intervention success and to provide a way to approach psychopathologies as disorders of the neurological system. Key Features: Provides state-of-the-science knowledge about the application of neuropsychological practice to the major forms of psychopathology Examines neurological and neuropsychological features of the major forms of psychopathology Demonstrates how the application of neurobiology and genetics to psychiatric disorders can increase accuracy of assessment, diagnosis, and treatment Considers adult versus child presentation of psychiatric disorders

The Neuropsychology Of Everyday Life Issues In Development And Rehabilitation

Author: David E. Tupper
Editor: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461315115
Size: 19,14 MB
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For a period of some fifteen years following completion of my internship training in clinical psychology (1950-1951) at the Washington University School of Medicine and my concurrent successful navigation through that school's neuroanatomy course, clinical work in neuropsychology for me and the psychologists of my generation consisted almost exclusively of our trying to help our physician colleagues differentiate patients with neurologic disorders from those with psychiatric disorders. In time, experience led all of us from the several disciplines involved in this enterprise to the conclusion that the crude diagnostic techniques available to us circa 1945-1965 had garnered little valid information on which to base such complex, differential diagnostic decisions. It now is gratifying to look back and review the remarkable progress that has occurred in the field of clinical neuropsychology in the four decades since I was a graduate student. In the late 1940s such pioneers as Ward Halstead, Alexander Luria, George Yacorzynski, Hans-Lukas Teuber, and Arthur Benton already were involved in clinical studies that, by the late 1960s, would markedly have improved the quality of clinical practice. However, the only psychological tests that the clinical psychologist of my immediate post Second Wodd War generation had as aids for the diagnosis of neurologically based conditions involving cognitive deficit were such old standbys as the Wechsler-Bellevue, Rorschach, Draw A Person, Bender Gestalt, and Graham Kendall Memory for Designs Test.

The Handbook Of The Neuropsychology Of Language

Author: Miriam Faust
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1444345885
Size: 18,43 MB
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This handbook provides a comprehensive review of new developments in the study of the relationship between the brain and language, from the perspectives of both basic research and clinical neuroscience. Includes contributions from an international team of leading figures in brain-language research Features a novel emphasis on state-of-the-art methodologies and their application to the central questions in the brain-language relationship Incorporates research on all parts of language, from syntax and semantics to spoken and written language Covers a wide range of issues, including basic level and high level linguistic functions, individual differences, and neurologically intact and different clinical populations

The Neuropsychology Of High Level Vision

Author: Martha J. Farah
Editor: Psychology Press
ISBN: 1135806594
Size: 15,10 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This book provides a state-of-the-art review of high-level vision and the brain. Topics covered include object representation and recognition, category-specific visual knowledge, perceptual processes in reading, top-down processes in vision -- including attention and mental imagery -- and the relations between vision and conscious awareness. Each chapter includes a tutorial overview emphasizing the current state of knowledge and outstanding theoretical issues in the authors' area of research, along with a more in-depth report of an illustrative research project in the same area. The editors and contributors to this volume are among the most respected figures in the field of neuropsychology and perception, making the work presented here a standard-setting text and reference in that area.

Psychoanalysis And Neuroscience

Author: Mauro Mancia
Editor: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 8847005507
Size: 11,92 MB
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Recent scientific studies have brought significant advances in the understanding of basic mental functions such as memory, dreams, identification, repression, which constitute the basis of the psychoanalytical theory. This book focuses on the possibility of interactions between psychoanalysis and neuroscience: emotions and the right hemisphere, serotonin and depression. It is a unique tool for professionals and students in these fields, and for operators of allied disciplines, such as psychology and psychotherapy.

The Unconscious

Author: Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317416805
Size: 20,45 MB
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The Unconscious explores the critical interdisciplinary dialogue between psychoanalysis and contemporary cognitive neuroscience. Characterised by Freud as ‘the science of the unconscious mind’, psychoanalysis has traditionally been viewed as a solely psychological discipline. However recent developments in neuroscience, such as the use of neuroimaging techniques to investigate the working brain, have stimulated and intensified the dialogue between psychoanalysis and these related mental sciences. This book explores the relevance of these discussions for our understanding of unconscious mental processes. Chapters present clinical case studies of unconscious dynamics, alongside theoretical and scientific papers in key areas of current debate and development. These include discussions of the differences between conceptualisations of ‘the unconscious’ in psychoanalysis and cognitive science, whether the core concepts of psychoanalysis are still plausible in light of recent findings, and how such understandings of the unconscious are still relevant to treating patients in psychotherapy today. These questions are explored by leading interdisciplinary researchers as well as practising psychoanalysts and psychotherapists. This book aims to bridge the gap between psychoanalysis and cognitive neuroscience, to enable a better understanding of researchers’ and clinicians’ engagements with the key topic of the unconscious. It will be of key interest to researchers, academics and postgraduate students in the fields of psychoanalysis, cognitive science, neuroscience and traumatology. It will also appeal to practising psychoanalysts, psychotherapists and clinicians.

Conscious And Unconscious Programs In The Brain

Author: Benjamin Kissin
Editor: Springer Science & Business Media
ISBN: 1461321875
Size: 19,14 MB
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For almost a century now, since Freud described the basic motivations and Pavlov the basic mechanisms of human behavior, we have had a reasonable concept of the forces that drive us. Only recently have we gained any real insight into how the brain really works to produce such behavior. The new developments in cognitive psychology and neuroscience have taught us things about the function of the brain that would have been inconceivable even ten years ago. Yet, there still remains a tremendous gap between the two studies-human behavior and brain function-a gap which often seems irrec oncilable in view of the basic differences in the methodologies and approaches of the two fields. Students of behavior are frequently disinterested in the underlying neu rophysiology while neurophysiologists tend to consider the concepts of psychiatrists and clinical psychologists too vague and theoretical to be applicable to their own more limited schemata. Several valiant attempts have been made by experimentalists to develop a theoretical context in which behavior is described, not separately from brain function but rather as its direct outgrowth. This present work is still another attempt to develop a theoretical system which, given the limitations of our present knowledge, as completely as possible, the underlying brain mechanisms that influ will describe ence and determine human behavior. The main emphasis of this work, however, will be not on normal behavior but rather on more neurotic manifestations.