The Point Of Words

Author: Ellen Winner
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A small child looks at a dripping faucet and says that it is drooling." Another calls a centipede a "comb." An older child notices the mess in his younger brother's room and says, "Wow, it sure is neat in here." Children's spontaneous speech is rich in such creative, nonliteral discourse. How do children's abilities to use and interpret figurative language change as they grow older? What does such language show us about the changing features of children's minds? In this absorbing book, psychologist Ellen Winner examines the development of the child's ability to use and understand metaphor and irony. These, she argues, are the two major forms of figurative language and are, moreover, complementary. Metaphor, which describes and sometimes explains, highlights attributes of a topic. As such, it serves primarily a cognitive function. Irony highlights the speaker's attitude toward the subject arid presupposes an appreciation of that attitude by the listener. In contrast to metaphor, irony serves primarily a social function. Winner looks in detail at the ways these forms of language differ structurally and at the cognitive and social capacities required for each. The book not only draws on the author's own empirical studies but also offers a valuable synthesis of research in the area: it is the first account that spans the realm of figurative language. Winner writes clearly and engagingly and enlivens her account with many vivid examples from children's speech. The book will appeal to developmental psychologists, educators, psychologists of language, early-language specialists, students of literature, indeed, anyone who is delighted by the fanciful utterances of young children.
The Point of Words
Language: en
Pages: 212
Authors: Ellen Winner
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 1988 - Publisher:

A small child looks at a dripping faucet and says that it is drooling." Another calls a centipede a "comb." An older child notices the mess in his younger brother's room and says, "Wow, it sure is neat in here." Children's spontaneous speech is rich in such creative, nonliteral discourse.
The Point of Words
Language: en
Pages: 212
Authors: Ellen Winner
Categories: Psychology
Type: BOOK - Published: 1997 - Publisher: Harvard University Press

Psychologist Ellen Winner studies the creative, nonliteral discourse of children's spontaneous speech, examining how their abilities to use and interpret figurative language change as they grow older, and what such language shows us about the changing features of children's minds.
The Grammar of Words: An Introduction to Linguistic Morphology
Language: en
Pages: 360
Authors: Geert Booij
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 2007-07-05 - Publisher: OUP Oxford

Geert Booij's popular textbook examines how words are formed, compounded, and inflected in different languages. It shows how, when, and why to use methods of morphological analysis and explains how morphology relates to syntax, phonology, and semantics. The author considers the universal characteristics of morphology and how these are reflected
Children in Culture, Revisited
Language: en
Pages: 232
Authors: K. Lesnik-Oberstein
Categories: Literary Criticism
Type: BOOK - Published: 2011-06-13 - Publisher: Springer

Children in Culture, Revisited follows on from the first volume, Children in Culture , and is composed of a range of chapters, newly written for this collection, which offer further fully inter- and multidisciplinary considerations of childhood as a culturally and historically constructed identity rather than a constant psycho-biological entity.
Linguistic Structures and Linguistic Laws
Language: en
Pages: 398
Authors: Ferenc Kovács
Categories: Language Arts & Disciplines
Type: BOOK - Published: 1971 - Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

This monograph has as its objective to give a critical survey of the development of the theories concerning the essence, the function, and the most characteristic (determining) features of language, and to explore and evaluate the motive forces responsible for this development. The author explains mainly the progressive elements of