The Rise And Fall Of Modern Medicine

Author: James Le Fanu
Editor: Hachette UK
ISBN: 0748131434
Size: 14,70 MB
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The medical achievements of the post-war years rank as one of the supreme epochs of human endeavour. Advances in surgical technique, new ideas about the nature of disease and huge innovations in drug manufacture vanquished most common causes of early death, But, since the mid-1970s the rate of development has slowed, and the future of medicine is uncertain. How has this happened? James Le Fanu's hugely acclaimed survey of the 'twelve definitive moments' of modern medicine and the intellectual vacuum which followed them has been fully revised and updated for this edition. The Rise and Fall of Modern Medicine is both riveting drama and a clarion call for change.

The Rise And Fall Of National Women S Hospital

Author: Linda Bryder
Editor: Auckland University Press
ISBN: 1775587231
Size: 14,10 MB
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Natural childbirth and rooming-in; artificial insemination and in vitro fertilisation; sterilisation and abortion: women's health and reproduction went through a revolution in the twentieth century as scientific advances confronted ethical and political dilemmas. In New Zealand, the major site for this revolution was National Women's Hospital. Established in Auckland in 1946, with a purpose-built building that opened in 1964, National Women's was the home of medical breakthroughs by Sir William (Bill) Liley and Sir Graham (Mont) Liggins; of the Lawson quintuplets and the 'glamorous gynaecologists'; and of scandals surrounding the so-called 'unfortunate experiment' and the neonatal chest physiotherapy inquiry. In this major history, Linda Bryder traces the evolution of National Women's in order to tell a wider story of reproductive health. She uses the varying perspectives of doctors, nurses, midwives, consumer groups and patients to show how together their dialogue shaped the nature of motherhood and women's health in twentieth-century New Zealand.

The Rise And Fall Of The Biopsychosocial Model

Author: S. Nassir Ghaemi
Editor: JHU Press
ISBN: 0801893909
Size: 10,68 MB
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Developed in the twentieth century as an outgrowth of psychosomatic medicine, the biopsychosocial model is seen as an antidote to the constraints of the medical model of psychiatry. Nassir Ghaemi details the origins and evolution of the BPS model and explains how, where, and why it fails to live up to its promises. He analyzes the works of its founders, George Engel and Roy Grinker Sr., traces its rise in acceptance, and discusses its relation to the thought of William Osler and Karl Jaspers.

The Rise And Fall Of Hmos

Author: Jan Coombs
Editor: Univ of Wisconsin Press
ISBN: 9780299202408
Size: 16,76 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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“Excellent. . . . This detailed analysis of how the Marshfield Clinic struggled to balance competing priorities and interest groups nicely illustrates the adage ‘If you see one HMO, you’ve seen one HMO.’”—Joel D. Howell, The Journal of American History

Biohealth

Author: Raymond Downing
Editor: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1621890422
Size: 15,34 MB
Format: PDF
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The development of modern medicine is on a very steep trajectory upward--a rise that began only about a hundred years ago. This rise is certainly quantitative, but it is accompanied by qualitative changes in the way we understand and deliver healthcare. This book begins with a look at three recognized periods of medical development--from 1900 until World War II, from the war until about 1980, and the period since 1980. While the common response is to celebrate these developments, this book suggests that perhaps we should also be wary, especially of the qualitative changes. Since World War II, these medical developments have entered more and more areas of our lives. It is precisely this process of medicalization that should be critically examined. Since 1980 we have medicalized life itself. Drawing from medical sociology, the book examines four characteristics of contemporary Western health care: health as a system, risk as a means of understanding health, health as a commodity, and individual responsibility for health. Critical examination of these four tendencies in contemporary health care forms the core of the argument of this important book about the essence of biohealth and medical practice.

The Rise And Fall Of Modern American Conservatism

Author: David Farber
Editor: Princeton University Press
ISBN: 1400834295
Size: 17,97 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism tells the gripping story of perhaps the most significant political force of our time through the lives and careers of six leading figures at the heart of the movement. David Farber traces the history of modern conservatism from its revolt against New Deal liberalism, to its breathtaking resurgence under Ronald Reagan, to its spectacular defeat with the election of Barack Obama. Farber paints vivid portraits of Robert Taft, William F. Buckley Jr., Barry Goldwater, Phyllis Schlafly, Ronald Reagan, and George W. Bush. He shows how these outspoken, charismatic, and frequently controversial conservative leaders were united by a shared insistence on the primacy of social order, national security, and economic liberty. Farber demonstrates how they built a versatile movement capable of gaining and holding power, from Taft's opposition to the New Deal to Buckley's founding of the National Review as the intellectual standard-bearer of modern conservatism; from Goldwater's crusade against leftist politics and his failed 1964 bid for the presidency to Schlafly's rejection of feminism in favor of traditional gender roles and family values; and from Reagan's city upon a hill to conservatism's downfall with Bush's ambitious presidency. The Rise and Fall of Modern American Conservatism provides rare insight into how conservatives captured the American political imagination by claiming moral superiority, downplaying economic inequality, relishing bellicosity, and embracing nationalism. This concise and accessible history reveals how these conservative leaders discovered a winning formula that enabled them to forge a powerful and formidable political majority. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Bad Medicine

Author: David Wootton
Editor: OUP Oxford
ISBN: 0191579564
Size: 16,39 MB
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Just how much good has medicine done over the years? And how much damage does it continue to do? The history of medicine begins with Hippocrates in the fifth century BC. Yet until the invention of antibiotics in the 1930s doctors, in general, did their patients more harm than good. In this fascinating new look at the history of medicine, David Wootton argues that for more than 2300 years doctors have relied on their patients' misplaced faith in their ability to cure. Over and over again major discoveries which could save lives were met with professional resistance. And this is not just a phenomenon of the distant past. The first patient effectively treated with penicillin was in the 1880s; the second not until the 1940s. There was overwhelming evidence that smoking caused lung cancer in the 1950s; but it took thirty years for doctors to accept the claim that smoking was addictive. As Wootton graphically illustrates, throughout history and right up to the present, bad medical practice has often been deeply entrenched and stubbornly resistant to evidence. This is a bold and challenging book - and the first general history of medicine to acknowledge the frequency with which doctors do harm.

2030 The Future Of Medicine

Author: Richard Barker
Editor: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 019960066X
Size: 19,83 MB
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Over the last couple of years, the credit crunch has driven a near-collapse of the world's financial systems. With the benefit of hindsight, many say this could have been predicted and avoided. Over the next 10-20 years, healthcare is headed for its own meltdown: an inability to fund the growth in demand and the appearance of costly new medical technology within the current healthcare systems framework. This 'meltdown' will not be as sudden as that in the world of finance: it will occur over the next 20 years, but the failure of the current sources of healthcare funding to meet our expectations of care quantity and quality will have consequences every bit as serious as the banking crisis. The warning signs are there, the crisis is already being predicted - but is it inevitable, or can it be avoided? This book offers a penetrating analysis of the underlying problems, and offers some simple, but far-reaching solutions to bring supply and demand back into balance and avoid the meltdown. It is not a contribution to the current political debate but a primer for the changes to the underlying fabric of healthcare if reforms such as "Obamacare" have any chance of sustainable success. In the course of the book, we confront many topical challenges: How can people be persuaded to manage their own health better?; Can we afford to spend more of today's money on disease prevention and detection, to save future costs?; Will 'personalised medicine' be cheaper, or more expensive?; Are healthcare IT systems a key part of the solution or doomed to be expensive white elephants?; and most importantly: What will the future of healthcare look like, for us and for our children and grandchildren? To bring the answers to this final question alive, the book uses a fictitious family, the Carters, to illustrate the changes we will see, the dilemmas we will face and the solutions we must strive for. Interspersed between the text are the vignettes of members of the family, their diseases and treatments and how change has affected each of their lives.

The Worst Of Evils

Author: Thomas Dormandy
Editor: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300113228
Size: 20,50 MB
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This riveting book takes the reader around the globe and through the centuries to discover how different cultures have sought to combat and treat physical pain. With colorful stories and sometimes frightening anecdotes, Dr. Thomas Dormandy describes a checkered progression of breakthroughs, haphazard experiments, ignorant attitudes, and surprising developments in human efforts to control pain. Attitudes toward pain and its perception have changed, as have the means of pain relief and scientific understanding. Dr. Dormandy offers a thoroughly fascinating, multi-cultural history that culminates with a discussion of today’s successes--and failures--in the struggle against pain. The book’s exploration is fused with accounts of the development of specific methods of pain relief, including the use of alcohol, plants, hypnosis, religious faith, stoic attitudes, local anesthesia, general anesthesia, and modern analgesics. Dr. Dormandy also looks at the most recent advances in pain clinics and palliative care for patients with terminal disease as well as the prospects for loosening pain’s grip in the future.

Why Us

Author: James Le Fanu
Editor: Vintage
ISBN: 9780307378071
Size: 18,15 MB
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In this daring treatise on the current state of scientific inquiry, James Le Fanu challenges the common assumption that further progress in genetic research and neuroscience must ultimately explain all there is to know about life and man’s place in the world. On the contrary, he argues, the most recent scientific findings point to an unbridgeable explanatory gap between the genes strung out along the Double Helix and the beauty and diversity of the living world—and between the electrical activity of the brain and the abundant creativity of the human mind. His exploration of these mysteries, and his analysis of where they might lead us in our thinking about the nature and purpose of human existence, form the impassioned and riveting heart of Why Us? From the Trade Paperback edition.