The Social Life Of Materials

Author: Adam Drazin
Editor: Bloomsbury Publishing
ISBN: 1472592662
File Size: 56,84 MB
Format: PDF
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Materials play a central role in society. Beyond the physical and chemical properties of materials, their cultural properties have often been overlooked in anthropological studies: finished products have been perceived as 'social' yet the materials which comprise them are considered 'raw' or natural'. The Social Life of Materials proposes a new perspective in this interdisciplinary field. Diverting attention from the consumption of objects, the book looks towards the properties of materials and how these exist through many transformations in a variety of cultural contexts. Human societies have always worked with materials. However, the customs and traditions surrounding this differ according to the place, the time and the material itself. Whether or not the material is man-made, materials are defined by social intervention. Today, these constitute one of the most exciting areas of global scientific research and innovation, harboring the potential to act as key vehicles of change in the world. But this 'materials revolution' has complex social implications. Smart materials are designed to anticipate our actions and needs, yet we are increasingly unable to apprehend the composite materials which comprise new products. Bringing together ethnographic studies of cultures from around the world, this collection explores the significance of materials by moving beyond questions of what may be created from them. Instead, the text argues that the materials themselves represent a shifting ground around which relationships, identities and powers are constantly formed and dissolved in the act of making and remaking.
The Social Life of Materials
Language: en
Pages: 304
Authors: Adam Drazin, Susanne Küchler
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-08-27 - Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

Materials play a central role in society. Beyond the physical and chemical properties of materials, their cultural properties have often been overlooked in anthropological studies: finished products have been perceived as 'social' yet the materials which comprise them are considered 'raw' or natural'. The Social Life of Materials proposes a
The Social Life of Materials
Language: en
Pages: 336
Authors: Adam Drazin, Susanne Küchler
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2020-06-08 - Publisher: Routledge

Materials play a central role in society. Beyond the physical and chemical properties of materials, their cultural properties have often been overlooked in anthropological studies: finished products have been perceived as ‘social’ yet the materials which comprise them are considered ‘raw’ or natural’. The Social Life of Materials proposes a
The Social Life of Pots
Language: en
Pages: 324
Authors: Judith A. Habicht-Mauche, Suzanne L. Eckert, Deborah L. Huntley
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 2006 - Publisher: University of Arizona Press

The demographic upheavals that altered the social landscape of the Southwest from the thirteenth through the seventeenth centuries forced peoples from diverse backgrounds to literally remake their worlds—transformations in community, identity, and power that are only beginning to be understood through innovations in decorated ceramics. In addition to aesthetic changes
The Social Life of Inkstones
Language: en
Pages: 330
Authors: Dorothy Ko
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2017-05-01 - Publisher: University of Washington Press

An inkstone, a piece of polished stone no bigger than an outstretched hand, is an instrument for grinding ink, an object of art, a token of exchange between friends or sovereign states, and a surface on which texts and images are carved. As such, the inkstone has been entangled with
The Social Life of Things
Language: en
Pages:
Authors: Arjun Appadurai
Categories: Social Science
Type: BOOK - Published: 1988-01-29 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

The meaning that people attribute to things necessarily derives from human transactions and motivations, particularly from how those things are used and circulated. The contributors to this volume examine how things are sold and traded in a variety of social and cultural settings, both present and past. Focusing on culturally