The Truths That Won T Stop

Author: Eric Zeidler
Editor: Lulu.com
ISBN: 0578072092
Size: 11,41 MB
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Futuristic novel of "schizophrenic worm's-eye omniscience." Society gets its chattels hipped on sakhar, a crystal-meth-like confection available in every candy store. Mystics possess the higher truth of Inner Peace. Soren, the protagonist, puts his trust in a syringe, and a switchblade.

On The Truths Contained In Popular Superstitions With An Account Of Mesmerism

Author: Herbert Mayo
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 17,59 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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The Triangle Of Truth

Author: Lisa Earle McLeod
Editor: Penguin
ISBN: 1101171472
Size: 12,97 MB
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"A must-read for anyone who wants to be more successful." -Keith Ferrazzi, author of #1 New York Times bestseller Who's Got Your Back This engaging and eye-opening book presents a bold model for rising above either/or thinking, recasting the debate on everything from sex and politics to business and religion. With refreshing wit and honesty, business consultant and columnist Lisa McLeod reveals why most of what we've been told about conflict resolution and compromise is wrong-and why the answers to even the most complex problems are closer at hand than we might think. A rare combination of personal insight, business wisdom, and humor, The Triangle of Truth is a just-in-time read for anyone who is tired of the arguments, angst, and stalemates and is ready for real solutions to our problems, large and small.

The Truth About Day Trading Stocks

Author: Josh DiPietro
Editor: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 9780470495858
Size: 11,99 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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The Truth About Day Trading Stocks A realistic guide to day trading today's stock market In terms of the potential for heavy financial losses, day trading is a high-risk profession. No one should contemplate day trading without giving thought to the ways he can lose, and all the ways to lessen or avoid them. Yet many people enter the game with unrealistic expectations, unaware of what it takes to succeed. Seminars and software alone do not make a successful day trader, cautions author Josh DiPietro. Instead, a trader must learn hard lessons of self-discipline, consistency, and staying in the game for the long haul to have a real chance of success. In The Truth About Day Trading Stocks, DiPietro offers the amateur day trader a brutally honest look at the pitfalls of day trading—and how to hopefully avoid them. Written in an engaging and sometimes humorous tone, The Truth About Day Trading Stocks draws on the author's own experiences as a day trader to offer a clear-cut departure from typical "golden goose" strategies promising instant wealth. Instead, he attempts to slow down the dangerous fervor of the average amateur and demonstrate the ways you can become a professional and not lose your shirt in the process. The Truth About Day Trading Stocks shows how trading decisions are bent and shaped by emotions, and why it is critical to know yourself, understand risk, and remember that increasing your skill level is a gradual, ongoing process—there's always more to learn! After dispensing with popular illusions, DiPietro proceeds to offer realistic, practical trading advice—comparing pay-per-trade with pay-per-share brokers, determining which works best and when, offering suggestions on how to avoid the prospect of perfect trades turning ugly, and more. At the end of the book, he also includes a section called "Rules to Remember," a list of over eighty rules, simply stated and easy to grasp, to benefit amateurs' performance. Throughout the book, the author describes his development of acute self-awareness while figuring out how to succeed. Through that blunt self-portrayal, the goal of The Truth About Day Trading Stocks is to help you create a disciplined mind-set and apply it to your own successful trading style.

An Inspiration Today

Author:
Editor: Lulu.com
ISBN: 0557004381
Size: 16,32 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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100 Ways To Stop Sabotaging Your Life

Author: James Egan
Editor: Lulu.com
ISBN: 1326234234
Size: 11,87 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This book looks at all of the traps we fall into in life and how to get out of them. Read on to cast off your emotional baggage, dissolve your anger problems, learn how to stop doubting yourself, overcome your shyness and become a better version of you. Alphabetised for easy reference, this book offers wise sayings from some of history's most accomplished individuals to help you keep working toward your goals and become the person you want to be.

Wake Up To Your W Hole Life

Author: Alaya Chadwick
Editor: iUniverse
ISBN: 1450242456
Size: 20,23 MB
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The Universal Story: Life has a way of catching us off guard, turning our world upside down or even shattering it in a second. We react ony to find ourselves in the same old pit again. Now what? Waking Up: Discover your hidden strategies and reveal your (W)holeness. A different WAY: You are the expert! All you need is the Wisdom Map. An invitation: Read this and experience surprising relief and potent aliveness. Alaya Chadwick is able to put hands and feet on extremely complex concepts in a way which connects them to the living reality of everyday life...An indispensable tool for assessing oneself in those volatile times. The brilliancy of this path is that once you learn to use the map, the way home is lovingly put into your own hands. - Martha Harrell, M.S.N. Ph.D., contributing author to Transforming Terror: Reclaiming the World Soul. Alaya confirms what weve long feared: its a near impossible journey to complete with only a partial understanding of how one integrates psyche and soul. Here, in the hands of this storyteller, therapist-minister extraordinaire, we find what weve longed for. - Sunny Shulkin, LCSW, BCD, Master Trainer of Harville Hendrixs Imago Relationship Therapy, co-author with Pat Love of the book How to Ruin a Perfectly Good Relationship.

Carnap Tarski And Quine At Harvard

Author: Greg Frost-Arnold
Editor: Open Court
ISBN: 0812698371
Size: 12,24 MB
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During the academic year 1940-1941, several giants of analytic philosophy congregated at Harvard: Bertrand Russell, Alfred Tarski, Rudlof Carnap, W. V. Quine, Carl Hempel, and Nelson Goodman were all in residence. This group held regular private meetings, with Carnap, Tarski, and Quine being the most frequent attendees. Carnap, Tarski, and Quine at Harvard allows the reader to act as a fly on the wall for their conversations. Carnap took detailed notes during his year at Harvard. This book includes both a German transcription of these shorthand notes and an English translation in the appendix section. Carnap’s notes cover a wide range of topics, but surprisingly, the most prominent question is: if the number of physical items in the universe is finite (or possibly finite), what form should scientific discourse, and logic and mathematics in particular, take? This question is closely connected to an abiding philosophical problem, one that is of central philosophical importance to the logical empiricists: what is the relationship between the logico-mathematical realm and the material realm studied by natural science? Carnap, Tarski, and Quine’s attempts to answer this question involve a number of issues that remain central to philosophy of logic, mathematics, and science today. This book focuses on three such issues: nominalism, the unity of science, and analyticity. In short, the book reconstructs the lines of argument represented in these Harvard discussions, discusses their historical significance (especially Quine’s break from Carnap), and relates them when possible to contemporary treatments of these issues. Nominalism. The founding document of twentieth-century Anglophone nominalism is Goodman and Quine’s 1947 “Steps Toward a Constructive Nominalism.” In it, the authors acknowledge that their project’s initial impetus was the conversations of 1940-1941 with Carnap and Tarski. Frost-Arnold's exposition focuses upon the rationales given for and against the nominalist program at its inception. Tarski and Quine’s primary motivation for nominalism is that mathematical sentences will be ‘unintelligible’ or meaningless, and thus perniciously metaphysical, if (contra nominalism) their component terms are taken to refer to abstract objects. Their solution is to re-interpret mathematical language so that its terms only refer to concrete entities—and if the number of concreta is finite, then portions of classical mathematics will be considered meaningless. Frost-Arnold then identifies and reconstructs Carnap’s two most forceful responses to Tarski and Quine’s view: (1) all of classical mathematics is meaningful, even if the number of concreta is finite, and (2) nominalist strictures lead to absurd consequences in mathematics and logic. The second is familiar from modern debates over nominalism, and its force is proportional to the strength of one’s commitment to preserving all of classical mathematics. The first, however, has no direct correlate in the modern debate, and turns upon the question of whether Carnap’s technique for partially interpreting a language can confer meaningfulness on the whole language. Finally, the author compares the arguments for and against nominalism found in the discussion notes to the leading arguments in the current nominalist debate: the indispensability argument and the argument from causal theories of reference and knowledge. Analyticity. Carnap, Tarski, and Quine’s conversations on finitism have a direct connection to the tenability of the analytic-synthetic distinction: under a finitist-nominalist regime, portions of arithmetic—a supposedly analytic enterprise—become empirical. Other portions of the 1940-41 notes address analyticity directly. Interestingly, Tarski’s criticisms are more sustained and pointed than Quine’s. For example, Tarski suggests that Gödel’s first incompleteness theorem furnishes evidence against Carnap’s conception of analyticity. After reconstructing this argument, Frost-Arnold concludes that it does not tell decisively against Carnap—provided that language is not treated fundamentally proof-theoretically. Quine’s points of disagreement with Carnap in the discussion notes are primarily denials of Carnap’s premises without argument. They do, however, allow us new and more precise characterizations of Carnap and Quine’s differences. Finally, the author forwards two historical conjectures concerning the radicalization of Quine’s critique of analyticity in the period between “Truth by Convention” and “Two Dogmas.” First, the finitist conversations could have shown Quine how the apparently analytic sentences of arithmetic could be plausibly construed as synthetic. Second, Carnap’s shift during his semantic period toward intensional analyses of linguistic concepts, including synonymy, perhaps made Quine, an avowed extensionalist, more skeptical of meaning and analyticity. Unity of Science. The unity of science movement originated in Vienna in the 1920s, and figured prominently in the transplantation of logical empiricism into North America in the 1940s. Carnap, Tarski, and Quine’s search for a total language of science that incorporates mathematical language into that of the natural and social sciences is a clear attempt to unify the language of science. But what motivates the drive for such a unified science? Frost-Arnold locates the answer in the logical empiricists’ antipathy towards speculative metaphysics, in contrast with meaningful scientific claims. I present evidence that, for logical empiricists over several decades, an apparently meaningful assertion or term is metaphysical if and only if that assertion or term cannot be incorporated into a language of unified science. Thus, constructing a single language of science that encompasses the mathematical and natural domains would ensure that mathematical entities are not on par with entelechies and Platonic Forms. The author explores various versions of this criterion for overcoming metaphysics, focusing on Carnap and Neurath. Finally, I consider an obstacle facing their strategy for overcoming metaphysics: there is no effective procedure to show that a given claim or term cannot be incorporated within a language.

The Truths Of Love

Author: raymond wells
Editor: Raymond Wells
ISBN:
Size: 17,84 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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ALL the Spiritual Truths and Understanding you will need

Breaking Out Of The Man Box

Author: Tony Porter
Editor: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1510701494
Size: 15,56 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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An international TED Talk speaker, Tony Porter challenges manhood and male socialization, which he defines as the “man box.” Tony Porter works closely with the NFL, the NBA, the MLB, the US military, colleges, universities, and numerous other organizations to prevent violence against women and girls by promoting healthy, respectful manhood. Now, in Breaking Out of the “Man Box” Porter’s message is directed at all men. This book tackles the collective socialization of manhood and provides an in-depth look at the experiences of boys and men. In an effort to understand the many aspects of “what it means to be a man,” Porter suggests the topic is worthy of being rethought, challenged, and even redefined. This book will help men—fathers, husbands, brothers, coworkers, etc.—unpack and correct those realities. Breaking Out of the “Man Box” boldly exposes the connection between male socialization and the quest to end violence against women and girls. Porter provides an honest and transformative experience, empowering men to create a world where men and boys are loving and respectful—and a human race where women and girls are valued and safe. On the heels of national movements and initiatives such as the NFL’s NoMore.org, this book provides men with the knowledge and understanding to explore how to create that world.