The Vanishing Neighbor The Transformation Of American Community

Author: Marc J. Dunkelman
Editor: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393243990
File Size: 71,78 MB
Format: PDF
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A sweeping new look at the unheralded transformation that is eroding the foundations of American exceptionalism. Americans today find themselves mired in an era of uncertainty and frustration. The nation's safety net is pulling apart under its own weight; political compromise is viewed as a form of defeat; and our faith in the enduring concept of American exceptionalism appears increasingly outdated. But the American Age may not be ending. In The Vanishing Neighbor, Marc J. Dunkelman identifies an epochal shift in the structure of American life—a shift unnoticed by many. Routines that once put doctors and lawyers in touch with grocers and plumbers—interactions that encouraged debate and cultivated compromise—have changed dramatically since the postwar era. Both technology and the new routines of everyday life connect tight-knit circles and expand the breadth of our social landscapes, but they've sapped the commonplace, incidental interactions that for centuries have built local communities and fostered healthy debate. The disappearance of these once-central relationships—between people who are familiar but not close, or friendly but not intimate—lies at the root of America's economic woes and political gridlock. The institutions that were erected to support what Tocqueville called the "township"—that unique locus of the power of citizens—are failing because they haven't yet been molded to the realities of the new American community. It's time we moved beyond the debate over whether the changes being made to American life are good or bad and focus instead on understanding the tradeoffs. Our cities are less racially segregated than in decades past, but we’ve become less cognizant of what's happening in the lives of people from different economic backgrounds, education levels, or age groups. Familiar divisions have been replaced by cross-cutting networks—with profound effects for the way we resolve conflicts, spur innovation, and care for those in need. The good news is that the very transformation at the heart of our current anxiety holds the promise of more hope and prosperity than would have been possible under the old order. The Vanishing Neighbor argues persuasively that to win the future we need to adapt yesterday’s institutions to the realities of the twenty-first-century American community.

Our Next Door Neighbor

Author: Gilbert Haven
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 40,42 MB
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Rekindling Democracy

Author: Cormac Russell
Editor: Wipf and Stock Publishers
ISBN: 1725253658
File Size: 18,42 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Finally, a book that offers a practical yet well-researched guide for practitioners seeking to hone the way they show up in citizen space. At a time when public trust in institutions is at its lowest, expectations of those institutions to make people well, knowledgeable, and secure are rapidly increasing. These expectations are unrealistic, causing disenchantment and disengagement among citizens and increasing levels of burnout among many professionals. Rekindling Democracy is not just a practical guide; it goes further in setting out a manifesto for a more equitable social contract to address these issues. Rekindling Democracy argues convincingly that industrialized countries are suffering through a democratic inversion, where the doctor is assumed to be the primary producer of health, the teacher of education, the police officer of safety, and the politician of democracy. Through just the right blend of storytelling, research, and original ideas, Russell argues instead that in a functioning democracy the role of the professionals ought to be defined as that which happens after the important work of citizens is done. The primary role of the twenty-first-century practitioner therefore is not a deliverer of top-down services, but a precipitator of more active citizenship and community building.

Citizen

Author: C. Andrew Doyle
Editor: Church Publishing
ISBN: 1640652019
File Size: 43,43 MB
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• A must-read for Christians in the present political conversation • Speaks to the larger narrative of faith rather than mere partisan storytelling Citizen helps Christians find our place in the politics of the world. In these pages, Bishop Andy Doyle offers a Christian virtue ethic grounded in fresh anthropology. He offers a vision of the individual Christian within the reign of God and the life of the broader community. He adds to the conversation in both church and culture by offering a renewed theological underpinning to the complex nature of Christianity in a post-modern world. How did we get here? Is this the way it has to be? Are there implications for conversations about politics within the church? Doyle contends that our current debates are not about one partisan narrative winning, but communities of diversity being unified by a relationship with God’s grand narrative. Crafting a deep theological conversation with a unified approach to the Old and New Testament, Citizen asks, what does it truly mean to live in community?

Happy Is The New Healthy

Author: Joan Neehall
Editor: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1948677709
File Size: 73,10 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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If there was ever a need for a book like this, it is now. As a world renowned expert on the subject, Dr. Joan Neehall is the one to deliver this message. Have you been stressed, anxious, or worried? Have you felt pangs of loneliness in recent times? Are you longing for greater connection with others and the world around you? In a phrase, Are you looking for happiness? If so, you are not alone—at least not statistically speaking. Millions of others are seeking this feeling of spiritual, mental, and physical wellness too. Now, in her latest book, Happy Is the New Healthy, forensic psychologist and bestselling author Dr. Joan Neehall explores the underlying causes of unhappiness, and shares with us the secrets to rewriting the frequent thoughts and redirecting the common behaviors that keep us in that state. Most importantly, she demonstrates, through examples from her 35 years of clinical practice, how others have successfully initiated the kinds of changes in their lives that engender the feelings of peace, satisfying connection, and enduring happiness we all seek. Of course, the advice in this book could not be more timely. A dedicated chapter not only acknowledges the very specific challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic presents for individual, societal, and global happiness, it advances ways to look at, cope with, and use the most daunting of circumstances to reimagine the kind of future that will make you happiest. By daring us to take charge of our emotional health and giving us the tools to do so, this book partners with its readers, reminding them that we are not at all alone in this pursuit.

What S Cooking In Your Neighbor S Pot

Author: American Council for Nationalities Service
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 20,79 MB
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Journal Of Vlsi Signal Processing Systems For Signal Image And Video Technology

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 54,21 MB
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Neighbours

Author: Ronald F. Holt
Editor: University of Queensland Press(Australia)
ISBN:
File Size: 70,81 MB
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A collection of 28 stories, written or first published in the 1980s, which focuses on the perspectives of non-English speaking Australians. Authors represented include Ania Walwicz, Lily Brett, James McQueen, Tim Winton and Beverley Farmer. The editor is the Director of the Centre for Culture and Language Studies at Charles Sturt University, and his previous anthologies include TThe Strength of Tradition'.

Public Opinion And Propaganda

Author: Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 60,75 MB
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Crime Control Digest

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 16,36 MB
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Nomads And Their Neighbours In The Russian Steppe

Author: Peter B. Golden
Editor: Routledge
ISBN:
File Size: 30,41 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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This collection of studies deals with the nomads of western Central Eurasia (Khazars, Oghuz, and Qipchaqs in particular) between the 6th and 13th centuries and their political and cultural interaction with their sedentary neighbors, especially Kievan Rus'

Self And Neighbour

Author: Edward Wales Hirst
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 76,45 MB
Format: PDF
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The Vanishing Dinosaur

Author: Brian L. Bex
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 60,68 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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California The Vanishing Dream

Author: Michael Davie
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 37,59 MB
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The Vanishing People

Author: Katharine Mary Briggs
Editor: Pantheon
ISBN: 9780394737409
File Size: 41,40 MB
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A book of traditional fairy lore. Internationally acclaimed as one of Britain's most respected folklore scholars, Katharine Briggs (1898-1980) was also one of the most popular authors in the field. These selected works provide some of her landmark writings, spanning the whole of her publishing career, from 1959 to 1980.

The Vanishing Tribes Of Kenya

Author: Sir Granville St. John Orde-Browne
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 25,58 MB
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Verifiability And The Vanishing Intermediate Exchange Rate Regime

Author: Jeffrey A. Frankel
Editor:
ISBN:
File Size: 42,21 MB
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The corners hypothesis holds that intermediate exchange rate regimes are vanishing, or should be. Surprisingly for a new conventional wisdom, this hypothesis so far lacks analytic foundations. In part, the generalization is overdone. We nevertheless offer one possible theoretical rationale, a contribution to the list of arguments against intermediate regimes: they lack verifiability, needed for credibility. Central banks announce intermediate targets such as exchange rates, so that the public can judge from observed data whether they are following the policy announced. Our general point is that simple regimes are more verifiable by market participants than complicated ones. Of the various intermediate regimes (managed float, peg with escape clause, etc.), we focus on basket pegs, with bands. Statistically, it takes a surprisingly long span of data to distinguish such a regime from a floating exchange rate. We apply the econometrics, first, to the example of Chile and, second, by performing Monte Carlo simulations. The amount of data required to verify the declared regime may exceed the length of time during which the regime is maintained. The amount of information necessary increases with the complexity of the regime, including the width of the band and the number of currencies in the basket.