Ulster Journal Of Archaeology

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The Ulster Journal Of Archaeology 1858 Vol 6 Classic Reprint

Author: Ulster Archaeological Society
Editor: Forgotten Books
ISBN: 9780267707829
Size: 18,53 MB
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Excerpt from The Ulster Journal of Archaeology, 1858, Vol. 6 Blessed Saviour's First Miracle (john. 11 1 To make the parallel complete, the change of water into wine is also made the first miracle of St. Columba: and Adamnan himself points out its identity with the first miracle of Christ. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

The Industrial Archaeology Of Northern Ireland

Author: William Alan McCutcheon
Editor: Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
ISBN: 9780838631256
Size: 14,40 MB
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A major study of the growth and decline of transport and industry in Ulster, this extremely detailed and comprehensive book throws new light on the infrastructure of corn grinding, spade forging, paper making, and other industries, and examines the mechanics of early road, bridge, and canal construction, more than 850 photographs and charts are contained in this volume.

Castles In Ireland

Author: T.E. McNeill
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1134708866
Size: 19,53 MB
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The castles of Ireland are an essential part of the story of medieval Europe, but were, until recently, a subject neglected by scholars. A lord's power and prestige was displayed in the majesty and uniqueness of his castle. The remains of several thousand castles enable us to reconstruct life in Ireland during these crucial centuries. Castles in Ireland tells the story of the nature and development of lordship and power in medieval Ireland. Ireland formed the setting to the interplay of the differing roles of competing lordships: English and Irish; feudal European and Gaelic; royal and baronial. Tom McNeill argues that the design of the castles contests the traditional view of Ireland as a land torn by war and divided culturally between the English and Irish.

Understanding Quartz Technology In Early Prehistoric Ireland

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Editor: Killian Driscoll
ISBN:
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An Historical Geography Of Railways In Great Britain And Ireland

Author: David Turnock
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1351958933
Size: 19,56 MB
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Although a great deal has been published on the economic, social and engineering history of nineteenth-century railways, the work of historical geographers has been much less conspicuous. This overview by David Turnock goes a long way towards restoring the balance. It details every important aspect of the railway’s influence on spatial distribution of economic and social change, providing a full account of the nineteenth-century geography of the British Isles seen in the context of the railway. The book reviews and explains the shape of the developing railway network, beginning with the pre-steam railways and connections between existing road and water communications and the new rail lines. The author also discusses the impact of the railways on the patterns of industrial, urban and rural change throughout the century. Throughout, the historical geography of Ireland is treated in equal detail to that of Great Britain.

Exploring Prehistoric Identity In Europe

Author: Victoria Ginn
Editor: Oxbow Books
ISBN: 1842177478
Size: 12,96 MB
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Identity is relational and a construct, and is expressed in a myriad of ways. For example, material culture and its pluralist meanings have been readily manipulated by humans in a prehistoric context in order to construct personal and group identities. Artefacts were often from or reminiscent of far-flung places and were used to demonstrate membership of an (imagined) regional, or European community. Earthworks frequently archive maximum visual impact through elaborate ramparts and entrances with the minimum amount of effort, indicating that the construction of identities were as much in the eye of the perceivor, as of the perceived. Variations in domestic architectural style also demonstrate the malleability of identity, and the prolonged, intermittent use of particular places for specific functions indicates that the identity of place is just as important in our archaeological understanding as the identity of people. By using a wide range of case studies, both temporally and spatially, these thought processes may be explored further and diachronic and geographic patterns in expressions of identity investigated.

The True Image

Author: Daniel W. Patterson
Editor: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 0807837539
Size: 18,24 MB
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A thousand unique gravestones cluster around old Presbyterian churches in the piedmont of the two Carolinas and in central Pennsylvania. Most are the vulnerable legacy of three generations of the Bigham family, Scotch Irish stonecutters whose workshop near Charlotte created the earliest surviving art of British settlers in the region. In The True Image, Daniel Patterson documents the craftsmanship of this group and the current appearance of the stones. In two hundred of his photographs, he records these stones for future generations and compares their iconography and inscriptions with those of other early monuments in the United States, Northern Ireland, and Scotland. Combining his reading of the stones with historical records, previous scholarship, and rich oral lore, Patterson throws new light on the complex culture and experience of the Scotch Irish in America. In so doing, he explores the bright and the dark sides of how they coped with challenges such as backwoods conditions, religious upheavals, war, political conflicts, slavery, and land speculation. He shows that headstones, resting quietly in old graveyards, can reveal fresh insights into the character and history of an influential immigrant group.

A Guide To The Stone Circles Of Britain Ireland And Brittany

Author: Aubrey Burl
Editor: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300114065
Size: 20,76 MB
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This practical and knowledgeable guidebook deals comprehensively with the stone circles of Britain and Ireland and with the cromlechs and megalithic "horseshoes" of Brittany. This new edition includes a section on "Druidical" circles, romantic creations of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. "This book is not only an elegant and practical guide, it is also the best single-volume study of this extraordinary phenomenon, embracing 500 monuments from Shetland to Brittany. . . . Confident, erudite, pleasurable, this volume can be recommended as travel guide, archaeology, literature, and sheer good company."--Ian Sheperd, British Archaeology "This is a wonderful book and is a must for anyone remotely interested in things megalithic."--Paul Walsh, Archaeology Ireland

The Iron Age In Lowland Britain

Author: D.W. Harding
Editor: Routledge
ISBN: 1317602862
Size: 15,79 MB
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This book was written at a time when the older conventional diffusionist view of prehistory, largely associated with the work of V. Gordon Childe, was under rigorous scrutiny from British prehistorians, who still nevertheless regarded the ‘Arras’ culture of eastern Yorkshire and the ‘Belgic’ cemeteries of south-eastern Britain as the product of immigrants from continental Europe. Sympathetic to the idea of population mobility as one mechanism for cultural innovation, as widely recognized historically, it nevertheless attempted a critical re-appraisal of the southern British Iron Age in its continental context. Subsequent fashion in later prehistoric studies has favoured economic, social and cognitive approaches, and the cultural-historical framework has largely been superseded. Routine use of radiocarbon dating and other science-based applications, and new field data resulting from developer-led archaeology have revolutionized understanding of the British Iron Age, and once again raised issues of its relationship to continental Europe.