Vernon And Irene Castle S Ragtime Revolution

Author: Eve Golden
Editor: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813172691
Size: 15,85 MB
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Vernon and Irene Castle popularized ragtime dancing in the years just before World War I and made dancing a respectable pastime in America. The whisper-thin, elegant Castles were trendsetters in many ways: they traveled with a black orchestra, had an openly lesbian manager, and were animal-rights advocates decades before it became a public issue. Irene was also a fashion innovator, bobbing her hair ten years before the flapper look of the 1920s became popular. From their marriage in 1911 until 1916, the Castles were the most famous and influential dance team in the world. Their dancing schools and nightclubs were packed with society figures and white-collar workers alike. After their peak of white-hot fame, Vernon enlisted in the Royal Canadian Flying Corps, served at the front lines, and was killed in a 1918 airplane crash. Irene became a movie star and appeared in more than a dozen films between 1917 and 1922. The Castles were depicted in the Fred Astaire-Ginger Rogers movie The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle (1939), but the film omitted most of the interesting and controversial aspects of their lives. They were more complex than posterity would have it: Vernon was charming but irresponsible, Irene was strong-minded but self-centered, and the couple had filed for divorce before Vernon's death (information that has never before been made public). Vernon and Irene Castle's Ragtime Revolution is the fascinating story of a couple who reinvented dance and its place in twentieth-century culture.

America Dancing

Author: Megan Pugh
Editor: Yale University Press
ISBN: 0300201311
Size: 17,83 MB
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An exuberant history of American dance, told through the lives of virtuoso performers who have defined the art

Scott Joplin And The Age Of Ragtime

Author: Ray Argyle
Editor: McFarland
ISBN: 0786443766
Size: 18,18 MB
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At the turn of the twentieth century, Scott Joplin struggled on the margins of society to play a pivotal role in the creation of ragtime music. His brief life and tragic death encompassed a tumultuous time of changes in modern music, culture, and technology. This biography follows Joplin's life from the brothels and bars of St. Louis to the music mills of Tin Pan Alley as he introduced a syncopated, lively style to classical piano.

The Oxford Handbook Of Dance And The Popular Screen

Author: Melissa Blanco Borelli
Editor: Oxford Handbooks
ISBN: 0199897824
Size: 11,88 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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This text offers new ways of understanding dance on the popular screen in new scholarly arguments drawn from dance studies, performance studies, and film and media studies. Through these arguments, it demonstrates how this dance in popular film, television, and online videos can be read and considered through the different bodies and choreographies being shown

The Product Of Our Souls

Author: David Gilbert
Editor: UNC Press Books
ISBN: 146962270X
Size: 14,21 MB
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In 1912 James Reese Europe made history by conducting his 125-member Clef Club Orchestra at Carnegie Hall. The first concert by an African American ensemble at the esteemed venue was more than just a concert--it was a political act of desegregation, a defiant challenge to the status quo in American music. In this book, David Gilbert explores how Europe and other African American performers, at the height of Jim Crow, transformed their racial difference into the mass-market commodity known as "black music." Gilbert shows how Europe and others used the rhythmic sounds of ragtime, blues, and jazz to construct new representations of black identity, challenging many of the nation's preconceived ideas about race, culture, and modernity and setting off a musical craze in the process. Gilbert sheds new light on the little-known era of African American music and culture between the heyday of minstrelsy and the Harlem Renaissance. He demonstrates how black performers played a pioneering role in establishing New York City as the center of American popular music, from Tin Pan Alley to Broadway, and shows how African Americans shaped American mass culture in their own image.

American Culture In The 1910s

Author: Mark Whalan
Editor: Edinburgh Univ Pr
ISBN:
Size: 18,72 MB
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With the publication of this volume, Edinburgh University Press closes out its extremely successful culture history series, which writes the story of the twentieth century through the cultural and intellectual movements of each decade. The 1910s were mostly dominated by the horrors of the first modern war, but it also witnessed the flowering of modernism, the birth of Hollywood, and the rise of progressive interpretations of culture and society. Mark Whalan investigates this decade through achievements in fiction and poetry; art and photography; film and vaudeville; and music, theater, and dance. He incorporates detailed commentary and directed case studies of influential texts and events and includes chronologies and bibliographies. He considers Tarzan of the Apes, The Birth of a Nation, the radical modernism of Gertrude Stein, the Provincetown Players, and jazz music's earliest recordings. A concluding chapter explores the impact of the First World War on cultural understandings of nationalism, citizenship, and propaganda.

This Is Ragtime

Author: Terry Waldo
Editor: Jazz at Lincoln Center Incorporated
ISBN:
Size: 13,21 MB
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Choice

Author:
Editor:
ISBN:
Size: 15,46 MB
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John Gilbert

Author: Eve Golden
Editor: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813141648
Size: 19,98 MB
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Charming and classically handsome, John Gilbert (1897--1936) was among the world's most recognizable actors during the silent era. He was a wild, swashbuckling figure on screen and off, and accounts of his life have focused on his high-profile romances with Greta Garbo and Marlene Dietrich, his legendary conflicts with Louis B. Mayer, his four tumultuous marriages, and his swift decline after the introduction of talkies. A dramatic and interesting personality, Gilbert served as one of the primary inspirations for the character of George Valentin in the Academy Award--winning movie The Artist (2011). Many myths have developed around the larger-than-life star in the eighty years since his untimely death, but this definitive biography sets the record straight. Eve Golden separates fact from fiction in John Gilbert: The Last of the Silent Film Stars, tracing the actor's life from his youth spent traveling with his mother in acting troupes to the peak of fame at MGM, where he starred opposite Mae Murray, Norma Shearer, Joan Crawford, Greta Garbo, and other actresses in popular films such as The Merry Widow (1925), The Big Parade (1925), Flesh and the Devil (1926), and Love (1927). Golden debunks some of the most pernicious rumors about the actor, including the oft-repeated myth that he had a high-pitched, squeaky voice that ruined his career. Meticulous, comprehensive, and generously illustrated, this book provides a behind-the-scenes look at one of the silent era's greatest stars and the glamorous yet brutal world in which he lived.

Anna Held And The Birth Of Ziegfeld S Broadway

Author: Eve Golden
Editor: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813146542
Size: 20,72 MB
Format: PDF
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" Anna Held (1870?-1918), a petite woman with an hourglass figure, was America's most popular musical comedy star during the two decades preceding World War I. In the colorful world of New York theater during La Belle Époque, she epitomized everything that was glamorous, sophisticated, and suggestive about turn-of-the-century Broadway. Overcoming an impoverished life as an orphan to become a music-hall star in Paris, Held rocketed to fame in America. From 1896 to 1910, she starred in hit after hit and quickly replaced Lillian Russell as the darling of the theatrical world. The first wife of legendary producer Florenz Ziegfeld Jr., Held was the brains and inspiration behind his Follies and shared his knack for publicity. Together, they brought the Paris scene to New York, complete with lavish costumes and sets and a chorus of stunningly beautiful women, dubbed ""The Anna Held Girls."" While Held was known for a champagne giggle as well as for her million-dollar bank account, there was a darker side to her life. She concealed her Jewish background and her daughter from a previous marriage. She suffered through her two husbands' gambling problems and Ziegfeld's blatant affairs with showgirls. With the outbreak of fighting in Europe, Held returned to France to support the war effort. She entertained troops and delivered medical supplies, and she was once briefly captured by the German army. Anna Held and the Birth of Ziegfeld's Broadway reveals one of the most remarkable women in the history of theatrical entertainment. With access to previously unseen family records and photographs, Eve Golden has uncovered the details of an extraordinary woman in the vibrant world of 1900s New York.