Walking In Derbyshire

Author: Elaine Burkinshaw
Editor: Cicerone Press Limited
ISBN: 1849655456
Size: 15,93 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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Guidebook to walking in Derbyshire and the Peak District. 60 circular day walks, ranging from 2 to 10 miles (4 to 14km), offer something for walkers of all abilities. The walks start from bases all over the area including Glossop, Buxton, Bakewell, Matlock, Ripley, Ashbourne and Derby. The routes are illustrated with OS map extracts and accompanied with the author's own photographs, as well as including plenty of practical information on getting to and around Derbyshire and the routes. Historic sites including Hardwick Hall, Kedleston Hall, Eyam, Chatsworth House (the fictional Pemberley), New Mills, Cromford, Goyt Valley and Dovedale are also explored, as are Bronze and Iron Age forts, medieval castles and ruined Abbeys. Walking routes pass remnants of ancient civilisations, fine market towns and villages, caverns, castles, country houses and parklands, historic spa resorts and industrial heritage sites, and the book is full of background information detailing the local history.

Discovery Walks In Derbyshire

Author: Paul A. Biggs
Editor: Sigma Press
ISBN: 9781850585541
Size: 12,38 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Derbyshire Walks With Children

Author: William D. Parke
Editor: Sigma Press
ISBN: 9781850586135
Size: 12,41 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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'Derbyshire Walks With Children' offers a range of routes chosen to appeal to all the family. All routes are less than six miles long, and come with detailed instructions for parents and interactive commentary for children.

Scotland S Mountain Ridges

Author: Dan Bailey
Editor: Cicerone Press Limited
ISBN: 1849654344
Size: 19,90 MB
Format: PDF
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A guidebook to the rich mix of summer scrambling, rock climbing and winter mountaineering on Scotland's ridges, from the remote Cairngorms to the splendour of the Cuillin. Graceful carved walkways slung between summits, twisted spines of stone - ridges can be the most beautiful of mountain landforms. With elegant lines and giddy exposure, ridge climbs emit a powerful siren call, drawing us out onto the rocks. Life on the edge has a special quality, born of the contrast of empty space all around, and intricate detail in close-up. The crests are strangely irresistible. Scotland's ridges are among the finest mountaineering lines in the country, every one a unique adventure. The variety of these routes reflects the breadth of the mountain experience: a rich mix of summer scrambles, technical rock and challenging winter climbs. This book covers both the popular classics and some obscure gems, aiming to celebrate these thrilling climbs as much as to document them. Along the way it explores landscapes of magnificent diversity, ranging from the remote desolation of the Cairngorms to the seaside splendour of the Cuillin, the great trench of Glencoe to the surreal exhibitionism of the far north. The chosen selection spans the grade range, with routes to suit all levels of ability. Whether an earthbound hillwalker or an accomplished climber, Scotland's ridges cannot fail to stir your imagination.

Walks In Silverdale And Arnside

Author: Brian Evans
Editor: Cicerone Press Limited
ISBN: 184965543X
Size: 16,82 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A walking guide to the Silverdale and Arnside Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB), at the top of Morecambe Bay in Cumbria and Lancashire, overlooking the Lake District. 21 day walks are described between Carnforth, Holme, Milnthorpe and Arnside, climbing wooded hills and limestone escarpments with views of the Lake District fells. Walks are between 2 and 8 miles in length and visit nature reserves including Leighton Moss RSPB reserve, follow the canal and explore the shoreline. Summits include Wharton Crag, Arnside Knott, Farleton Knott and Hutton Roof Crags. The combinations of rocky coastal scenery, woodland and rough limestone hills either side of the M6 in north Lancashire, make this a paradise for walkers. Routes can easily be linked into longer walks and the extensive network of well walked paths enables walks to be shortened or lengthened at will. The area is renowned for its flora and fauna, its historic buildings and interesting geological features.

The Wye Valley Walk

Author: The Wye Valley Walk Partnership
Editor: Cicerone Press Limited
ISBN: 1849658358
Size: 12,11 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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Official guidebook to the Wye Valley Walk. Following the River Wye for 136 miles from the mouth of the river at Chepstow to the slopes of Plynlimon in Powys, the Wye Valley offers a perfect mix of river and hill walking. Devised by the Wye Valley Walk Partnership, the walk takes up to two weeks to complete, and enjoys the superb scenery of the Wye Valley Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Illustrated with colour photographs and OS map extracts, and also includes a Wye Valley Walk passport, for walkers to collect stamps along the route for a permanent record of their journey. The Way offers a perfect mix of river and hill walking as it follows the River Wye. The walk leads through a dramatic limestone gorge, dense woodland beneath limestone crags and past peaceful river meadows in some of the most superb scenery in the heart of the Wye Valley.

Walking In The Cordillera Cantabrica

Author: Robin Walker
Editor: Cicerone Press Limited
ISBN: 184965929X
Size: 13,23 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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A guide to walking in the Cordillera Cantabrica mountains in northern Spain - one of Spain's premier ranges - including detailed descriptions of 60 routes spread around the whole of this magnificent mountain chain. Based on selected valley bases, the routes are readily accessed, thus minimising travel time. All of the routes can be done in a day and all are circular. In difficulty they vary from straightforward, half-day outings to strenuous, full-day ascents demanding fitness, good overall mountain skills, and the ability to deal with short sections of scrambling. This guide is complemented by articles on four specialist topics of interest to any who wish to know the range in greater depth: place names, the transhumance, the Civil War and alpine flora. The Cordillera Cantabrica is currently home to a total of nine protected areas, including three UN-designated areas.

White Peak Walks The Southern Dales

Author: Mark Richards
Editor: Cicerone Press Limited
ISBN: 1849655057
Size: 19,37 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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A guide to walking the southern dales of the White Peak area of the Peak District, England UK, between Ashbourne, Matlock, Buxton and Leek. In 1951 the Peak District - 555 square miles of breathing space between the cities of Manchester and Sheffield - became the UK's first National Park and rightly so. This much-loved landscape has cultural integrity, geographical variety, treasured wildlife habitats and lots of recreational opportunities. Its rockier southern half, the White Peak, takes its name from the underlying limestone and is a charming mosaic of idyllic villages, pastures, woods and valleys. The walks in this guide explore both the high rolling plateau and the seclusion of the side dales, following the twists and turns of the Dove, Manifold and Hamps rivers. The book offers a wide selection of easy circular routes of up to 10 miles, illustrated with OS map extracts and forms one of the first two books in Cicerone's three-volume series on the Peak District.

The Ceredigion And Snowdonia Coast Paths

Author: John B Jones
Editor: Cicerone Press Limited
ISBN: 1783620552
Size: 11,13 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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As part of the Wales Coast Path, the Ceredigion Coast Path and Snowdonia Coast Path trace a curve of 233km (145 miles) of coastal and inland walking down Cardigan Bay. This guidebook describes a 16-stage guide to the walk from Porthmadog to St Dogmaels covering the trail between the Llyn Peninsula and the Pembrokeshire Coast Path. The route is illustrated with OS map extracts as well as extra sketch maps of tricky sections and lots of information is included about public transport links, accommodation and facilities to help you plan how to tackle the trail. Stong walkers could complete the full walk in just less than two weeks, but it's also worth considering building in rest days in order to visit, say Harlech Castle, or ride on of the narrow gauge railways.

Unjustifiable Risk

Author: Simon Thompson
Editor: Cicerone Press Limited
ISBN: 1849656991
Size: 16,39 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
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To the impartial observer Britain does not appear to have any mountains. Yet the British invented the sport of mountain climbing and for two periods in history British climbers led the world in the pursuit of this beautiful and dangerous obsession. Unjustifiable Risk is the story of the social, economic and cultural conditions that gave rise to the sport, and the achievements and motives of the scientists and poets, parsons and anarchists, villains and judges, ascetics and drunks that have shaped its development over the past two hundred years. The history of climbing inevitably reflects the wider changes that have occurred in British society, including class, gender, nationalism and war, but the sport has also contributed to changing social attitudes to nature and beauty, heroism and death. Over the years, increasing wealth, leisure and mobility have gradually transformed climbing from an activity undertaken by an eccentric and privileged minority into a sub-division of the leisure and tourist industry, while competition, improved technology and information, and increasing specialisation have helped to create climbs of unimaginable difficulty at the leading edge of the sport. But while much has changed, even more has remained the same. Today's climbers would be instantly recognisable to their Victorian predecessors, with their desire to escape from the crowded complexity of urban society and willingness to take "unjustifiable" risk in pursuit of beauty, adventure and self-fulfilment. Unjustifiable Risk was shortlisted for the Boardman Tasker prize in 2011.