War Democracy And Culture In Classical Athens

Author: Dr. David Pritchard
Editor: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 0521190339
File Size: 78,75 MB
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Analyses how the democracy of the classical Athenians revolutionized military practices and underwrote their unprecedented commitment to war-making.
War, Democracy and Culture in Classical Athens
Language: en
Pages: 460
Authors: Dr. David Pritchard
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2010-12-23 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Analyses how the democracy of the classical Athenians revolutionized military practices and underwrote their unprecedented commitment to war-making.
Athenian Democracy at War
Language: en
Pages: 296
Authors: David M. Pritchard
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2018-11-29 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Studies all four branches of the Athenian armed forces to show how they helped make democratic Athens a superpower.
Sport, Democracy and War in Classical Athens
Language: en
Pages: 251
Authors: David M. Pritchard
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2013 - Publisher: Cambridge University Press

Explains why the democracy of classical Athens generously sponsored elite sport and idolised its sporting victors.
Public Spending and Democracy in Classical Athens
Language: en
Pages: 209
Authors: David M. Pritchard
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2015-07-01 - Publisher: University of Texas Press

In his On the Glory of Athens, Plutarch complained that the Athenian people spent more on the production of dramatic festivals and "the misfortunes of Medeas and Electras than they did on maintaining their empire and fighting for their liberty against the Persians." This view of the Athenians' misplaced priorities
Public Spending and Democracy in Classical Athens
Language: en
Pages: 209
Authors: David M. Pritchard
Categories: History
Type: BOOK - Published: 2016-05-01 - Publisher: University of Texas Press

In his On the Glory of Athens, Plutarch complained that the Athenian people spent more on the production of dramatic festivals and "the misfortunes of Medeas and Electras than they did on maintaining their empire and fighting for their liberty against the Persians." This view of the Athenians' misplaced priorities