Writing At The Kitchen Table

Author: Artemis Cooper
Editor: Faber & Faber
ISBN: 0571279775
Size: 15,35 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 159
Download

Elizabeth David was born into a upper-class family and pursued a rebellious and bohemian life as a student of art and then an actress in Paris, before running off with a married man to Greece and then settling in Cairo, where she worked for the British government. After the Second World War, she returned to England, where she was shocked by poor food into writing first articles, then books on Meditteranean cooking. A Book of Mediterranean Food was published in 1950, inspiring a cookery revolution, bringing new flavours and ingredients to the drab, post-war British diet. Over the next few years, David was to become a major influence on British cooking, yet her classic cookery books show little of the colourful personality behind the public persona. Artermis Cooper, in this refreshing biography, reveals an adventurous and uncompromising personality - a woman with a passion for food, life and men. This is the whole story: of her strong friendships, her failed marriage, tempestuous affairs and the greatest love of her life, told with extensive refererence to David's private papers and letters. 'In this wonderful and creative book, Cooper has brought David to life... she not only writes like an angel, but has done her research with great skill and obvious enjoyment.' Derek Cooper, Sunday Times 'Engagingly well-written, thoroughly researched and documented. One of the delights of Artemis Cooper's book is that it makes you go back, time and again, to the source. And suddenly I will find that I have whiled away the afternoon re-reading, for the sheer pleasure of it, half of Spices or An Omlette and a Glass of Wine.' Frances Bissell, The Times 'Fluent, engaging and astonishingly readable.' Clarissa Dickson Wright, Mail on Sunday 'Artemis Cooper is skilled and wise enough to handle the contradictory sides of David's character without being either censorious or sensational.' Arabella Boxer, The Times Literary Supplement

Writing At The Edge

Author: Jeff Park
Editor: Peter Lang
ISBN: 9780820467856
Size: 20,41 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 531
Download

In Writing at the Edge, Jeff Park invites the reader to see personal writing as the metaphorical space where individuals negotiate meaning with others and the world. Drawing upon writing process theory, curriculum theory, narrative theory, and many years of practice, this book explores writing in relation to the «self», but dares to include the multiplicities and contradictions of social and cultural constructions of gender, power, and politics. Park uses the metaphor of the «riparian zone» to reconsider the value of writing as a site of negotiation of self, culture, and society. This book is the best of curriculum theory and narrative inquiry, as well as a stunning invitation to those working in language arts, writing, and teacher education to reconsider personal writing as a place of great diversity, beauty, and paradox.

Profiles From The Kitchen

Author: Charles A. Baker-Clark
Editor: University Press of Kentucky
ISBN: 0813171334
Size: 13,23 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 696
Download

In an age where convenience often ranks above quality, many Americans have abandoned traditional recipes and methods of cooking for fast solutions to their hunger and nourishment needs. Modern families are busier than ever, juggling hectic schedules that send them to fast-food restaurant drive-through windows and to grocery stores crowded with pre-processed and ready-to-eat foods. With parents frequently working during the daytime, efficient food preparation in the evenings has become the number one priority in kitchens across the country. This trend began during the post--World War II years, which heralded the arrival of "fast foods" and innovative technological advancements that sought to simplify the cooking process. These products were marketed as quick and convenient alternatives that transformed the concept of cooking from a cultural activity and a means of bonding with one's family to a chore that should occupy as little time and energy as possible. Profiles from the Kitchen: What Great Cooks Have Taught Us about Ourselves and Our Food is Charles A. Baker-Clark's call to abandon the "homogenization of food and dining experiences" by encouraging us to reclaim knowledge of cooking and eating and reconnect with our ethnic, familial, and regional backgrounds. Baker-Clark profiles fifteen individuals who have shaped our experiences with food and who have gone beyond popular trends to promote cooking as a craft worth learning and sustaining. The cooks and food critics he writes about emphasize the appreciation of good cooking and the relationship of food to social justice, spirituality, and sustainability. Profiles from the Kitchen highlights prominent figures within the food industry, from nationally and internationally known individuals such as Paul and Julia Child, James Beard, and M.F.K. Fisher to regional food experts such as John T. Edge and Dennis Getto. The result is a collective portrait of foodlovers who celebrate the rich traditions and histories associated with food in our daily lives and who encourage us to reestablish our own connections in the kitchen.

Writing Our Lives

Author: Steven Joel Rubin
Editor: Jewish Publication Society
ISBN: 9780827603936
Size: 12,22 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 974
Download

Twenty-eight selections from the writings of some of the best-known American-Jewish novelists, dramatists, critics, and historians span the social and cultural history of American Jews in the twentieth century. Often joyous, occasionally tragic, they provide a fascinating record—from immigration to assimilation, from life in the ghetto to the current movement by many to recapture their Jewish identity. At once personal and historical, the selections are poignant and moving testimonies to the perseverance of the American-Jewish people.

Alexandria

Author: Michael Haag
Editor: Yale University Press
ISBN: 9780300104158
Size: 18,38 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Mobi
Read: 708
Download

This book is a literary, social, and political portrait of Alexandria at a high point of its history. Drawing on diaries, letters, and interviews, Michael Haag recovers the lost life of the city, its cosmopolitan inhabitants, and its literary characters. Located on the coast of Africa yet rich in historical associations with Western civilization, Alexandria was home to an exotic variety of people whose cosmopolitan families had long been rooted in the commerce and the culture of the entire Mediterranean world. Alexandria famously excited the imaginations of writers, and Haag folds intimate accounts of E. M. Forster, Greek poet Constantine Cavafy, and Lawrence Durrell into the story of its inhabitants. He recounts the city’s experience of the two world wars and explores the communities that gave Alexandria its unique flavor: the Greek, the Italian, and the Jewish. The book deftly harnesses the sexual and emotional charge of cosmopolitan life in this extraordinary city, and highlights the social and political changes over the decades that finally led to Nasser’s Egypt.

Scenes Of The Apple

Author: Tamar Heller
Editor: SUNY Press
ISBN: 9780791457849
Size: 11,65 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
Read: 492
Download

Examines the rich and multiple meanings of food in women's writing.

English For College Learners

Author:
Editor: Goodwill Trading Co., Inc.
ISBN: 9789715740517
Size: 18,17 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
Read: 930
Download


Demystifying Dissertation Writing

Author: Peg Boyle Single
Editor: Stylus Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 1579226868
Size: 20,73 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
Read: 481
Download

Research shows that five strategies correlate with the successful completion of a dissertation: Establishing a consistent writing routine Working with a support group Consulting your advisor Understanding your committee’s expectations Setting a realistic and timely schedule Building on these insights, this book is for anyone who needs help in preparing for, organizing, planning, scheduling, and writing the longest sustained writing project they have encountered, particularly if he or she is not receiving sufficient guidance about the process, but also for anyone looking to boost his or her writing productivity. The author uncovers much tacit knowledge, provides advice on working with dissertation advisors and committee members, presents proven techniques for the prewriting and writing stages of the dissertation, sets out a system for keeping on schedule, and advocates enlisting peer support. As Peg Boyle Single states, “my goal is quite simple and straightforward: for you to experience greater efficiency and enjoyment while writing. If you experience anxiety, blocking, impatience, perfectionism or procrastination when you write, then this system is for you. I want you to be able to complete your writing so that you can move on with the rest of your life.” Few scholars, let alone graduate students, have been taught habits of writing fluency and productivity. The writing skills imparted by this book will not only help the reader through the dissertation writing process, but will serve her or him in whatever career she or he embarks on, given the paramount importance of written communication, especially in the academy. This book presents a system of straightforward and proven techniques that are used by productive writers, and applies them to the dissertation process. In particular, it promotes the concept of writing networks – whether writing partners or groups – to ensure that writing does not become an isolated and tortured process, while not hiding the need for persistence and sustained effort. This book is intended for graduate students and their advisers in the social sciences, the humanities, and professional fields. It can further serve as a textbook for either informal writing groups led by students or for formal writing seminars offered by departments or graduate colleges. The techniques described will help new faculty advice their students more effectively and even achieve greater fluency in their own writing.

Writing Down The Bones

Author: Natalie Goldberg
Editor: Shambhala Publications
ISBN: 1590302613
Size: 18,57 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
Read: 473
Download

Offers advice on writing creatively, discusses the importance of discipline, and suggests writing exercises.

Fort Steele

Author: Naomi Miller
Editor: Heritage House Publishing Co
ISBN: 9781894384384
Size: 16,26 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
Read: 453
Download

Fort Steele began in 1864 as the site of John Galbraith's ferry, which transported eager gold seekers across the Kootenay River to nearby Wild Horse Creek. Major Sam Steele's "D" Division of the North West Mounted Police built Kootenay Post here in 1887 and helped alleviate tensions between white settlers and the Native Ktunaxa people. With all disputes settled peacefully and Steele recalled to Alberta to take on a new challenge, the appreciative residents renamed the town in 1888 to honour the highly regarded Mountie. As more settlers came, trails became roads. In summer, riverboats ran north and south to link with railways. Government offices made Fort Steele the administrative centre for East Kootenay. A bustling business community developed, and a newspaper was born. A school, three churches, an Opera House, and a hospital soon followed. Fort Steele boomed until the BC Southern Railway bypassed it. Naomi Miller, a local resident and interpreter at Fort Steele Heritage Town, provides many insights into the lives of the citizens of the town and district.